Question Yourself - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

13 Essential Tips for Taking a Sabbatical

Question Yourself

Running off to treat your workplace burnout might not be the best solution. Ask yourself first if your work is fulfilling. If not, it is better to try and find something else first, then take some time off before you start a new position. 

135 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

13 Essential Tips for Taking a Sabbatical

13 Essential Tips for Taking a Sabbatical

https://www.careeraddict.com/taking-a-sabbatical

careeraddict.com

13

Key Ideas

Have a Good Reason

You need a good reason for your time off. 

It could be doing something on your bucket list, like volunteering or teaching, or doing a crash course in a new skill.

Check Your Company Policy

Before you plan a sabbatical, check with your HR department to see what the policy is regarding extended breaks.

Many organizations allow workers a certain amount of unpaid leave.

Get Advice from Your Peers

Get advice from your peers who have been in a similar position. Find out how to be prepared for a sabbatical and if they think it was a wise choice.

Set a Date

It is probably a good idea to set a date in advance to ensure both your employer and yourself have enough time to plan.

Finances

Make sure your finances are in order before you take the plunge.

You could also think about raising money or cutting your expenses. Many people work part-time or take on freelance jobs while on sabbatical to supplement their financial situation.

Develop Your Pitch

Most bosses will be skeptical about losing a valued team member for a large period of time.

Mention that taking a sabbatical could positively affect your career. You could also suggest hiring a trainee to cover your duties.

Give Plenty of Notice

Most contracts require a year's notice for a sabbatical.

Be sure to speak to your employer as soon as possible.

Create a Road Map

Create a plan on what you will be doing on your career break so your goals are more visible.

Plan Your Exit Strategy

Plan your leave well in advance. Create a guide with instructions for your replacement (if there is one) or a detailed brief on your ongoing projects for your colleagues.

Keep in Touch

While on our sabbatical, keep in touch with your workplace. Offer to help out with anything if they need you to. Make sure you stay visible. Arrange a hand-back-to meeting before you go.

You could even keep them up to date with your experiences while you're traveling.

Document Your Journey

It will be a way of keeping in touch with your friends and family and allow you to put in context what you’ve achieved over your time off from work. 

Consider writing a personal diary, blog, or posting on your social media pages. 

Keep Your Skills Updated

Research shows than half of the hiring managers surveyed say the most important thing they look at when hiring candidates is how they kept their skills updated during a career break.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

What Perspective Taking Is

It’s the ability to take on someone else’s point of view when thinking.

By taking yourself out of the equation, the motivations of your opponent becomes clearer. And by understanding the othe...

Develop perspective taking
  • Put aside your feelings so that you can concentrate only on the other person’s perspective.
  • Use open ended questions that can help you draw out the interests and motivation that the person may not be verbalizing.
  • Be clear about your own position and the weaknesses it has.
  • Remove any personal intentions you may have, so as not to project them on to the other person.
  • Using what you know about the person, their background, their mood, their intentions and expectations,  imagine how they are seeing the current situation.
  • Validate their position by paraphrasing back to them what you think their position is.
Using perspective taking

When you break it down, almost every aspect of business involves an element of negotiation. 

By honing your perspective taking skills, you are much more likely to come up with solutions that are acceptable to all parties.

Confirm with everyone

It's not uncommon for hiring managers to hand you over to someone else on the team to meet you at the last minute. Send a quick email to encourage them to plan: 

Hi Kamala, I’m really...

The interviewer’s LinkedIn and Twitter

Skim their history on LinkedIn, then move way down to the bottom. If they have endorsements and recommendations, it can give you a feel for their management style.

Twitter can help you guess at an interviewer's personality, interests, and values.

Your “about me” answer

Your interviewer will probably open with some form of "Tell me a little about yourself.Plan your answer using a few quick bullet points to keep things brief en then commit it loosely to memory.

  • Skip your personal history.
  • Give two or three sentences about your career path.
  • Mention how you decided to apply to this job.
  • Leave enough curiosity that the interviewer becomes excited to learn more about you.

one more idea

The email hibernation experiment

The email experiment works as follows:

  • No logging in to any primary email accounts for the entire month.
  • Setting up automatic forwarding to an assistant to ensure nothing urge...
Email is addictive

According to a 2018 survey, the average creative professional spends 5.6 hours per day checking email.

Once you make up your mind to make the mail app less accessible, it is much easier to give up email. Leave the phone outside the bedroom to help build resilience to the email habit.

Most emails aren't important

Most emails are of little value. We often remember the extraordinary, like the once-in-a-lifetime invitation, but not the ordinary - that possibly only three percent of emails are worth reading.

4 more ideas