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How to Deal with Negative People

Ask the right questions

To get to the root of why a person's opinion is the way it is, one question you might want to ask is the simplest 'why?'

"Why?" is the most powerful question you can ask a person who is giving you their opinion because it allows you to determine what assumptions inform their opinions.

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How to Deal with Negative People

How to Deal with Negative People

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-deal-with-negative-people-5988560

lifehacker.com

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Key Ideas

Dealing with negative people

It's primarily about learning to differentiate between the opinions you should consider and the ones you should ignore.

You'll always run into negative people, so the best thing you can really do is figure out if their advice is worth following or not.

Find the critic's baseline

... before you assume they are being negative.

By spending a little time figuring out how they usually are (if they are optimistic, pessimistic or pragmatic), you will be able to differentiate between the times that they are just being themselves versus the times that they may be recognizing something truly noteworthy.

Follow the "Three's company" rule

Just because a person's a pessimist doesn't mean they're not right. And an easy way to figure if their advice is worth following is to simply ask around and figure out if a consensus exists that falls in line with the person's view.

If it's a unanimous opinion, then perhaps that person isn't as pessimistic as you think, and you should consider their advice.

Ask the right questions

To get to the root of why a person's opinion is the way it is, one question you might want to ask is the simplest 'why?'

"Why?" is the most powerful question you can ask a person who is giving you their opinion because it allows you to determine what assumptions inform their opinions.

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