Approaching Burnout At Work

Approaching Burnout At Work

Feeling and identifying the signs of job burnout is a powerful way to arm yourself with the strategies and resources needed to prevent it from bringing you down. So if it’s time to sit down with your manager or HR team, set up that meeting.

Explain that working longer hours is not leading to your most productive and happiest self. Most companies rather make a small adjustment than having to hire somebody else.

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It’s a syndrome that results from an extreme accumulation of improperly managed workplace stress that can lead to physical, mental, and social consequences.

To prevent a future burnout, when searching for a new position, consider the following:

  • Most countries have legal mechanisms that allow for at least unpaid leave.
  • Many companies have time-off policies for employees needing a mental health break.
  • Most interviewers are aware of their companies’ work-life balance and can inform you if it’s a good fit for your need for “offline” hours in which you’re unavailable for work issues.
  • Use balance and prioritization in your workday.
  • Watch yourself for burnout indicators. If you’re close to it, reevaluate your working habits.
  • Set clear boundaries.
  • Avoid answering to work-related call outside of work.
  • Try not to feel guilty if you need to or can leave work early.
  • Schedule regular wellness check-ins with your boss and team so you can identify overburdened individuals.
  • Redistribute work if someone is at capacity.
  • If you feel depressed, anxious or highly stressed, seek help from a trained professional.

When a person tends to always be “on, ” they become more likely to burnout. Many push themselves to the point of depression, exhaustion, and helplessness by working countless hours.

Workload reduction and coping strategies are necessary to prevent burnout. Not dealing with the problem puts you at risk of having to quit and retrain, which might bring a whole host of problems on top of the burnout.

  • Being cynical and critical at work
  • Being irritable or impatient with co-workers, customers, or clients
  • Lack of energy to be consistently productive
  • Extreme difficulty concentrating on tasks
  • Lack of satisfaction in your achievements at work
  • Difficulty sleeping at night
  • Experience irregular physical ailments such as headaches and stomach aches
  • Lose enthusiasm for day-to-day responsibilities
  • Daily struggle to get out of bed
  • Resent people and things that keep you from working outside of work
  • Think that work is the only source of satisfaction.

Strong morning and nighttime routines increase your productivity levels, ability to focus, and improve your overall mental and physical health. Your routines can include a healthy meal, exercise, reading, meditation, enjoying time with your family and friends.

However you build your routines, they should be full of activities that bring you joy and fulfillment. Self-care is essential to dealing with job burnout.

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What burnout is

Burnout can be broken down into three parts:

  • Exhaustion: it could lead you to be easily upset, have trouble sleeping, get sick more often, and struggle to concentrate.
  • Cynicism: feeling alienated from the people you work with and lacking engagement in your work.
  • Inefficacy: it refers to a lack of belief in your ability to perform your job well and a decrease in achievement and productivity.
Understand your limitations

Burnout occurs when job demands consistently outweigh the resources available. The first thing you need to do is to set proper limits.

When you limit your time spent on specific tasks, you give yourself permission to make choices. Instead of fighting perfectionism for example, you learn to stop when things are good enough.

  • Prepare your questions based on the attributes of an ideal candidate,
  • Reduce stress level. Tell the candidates in advance the questions you plan to ask.
  • Involve enough people for multiple checks.
  • Assess potential. Look for signs of the candidate's curiosity, insight, engagement, and determination.
  • Ask behavioral and situational questions.
  • Consider "cultural fit", but don't obsess because people adapt.
  • Sell the role and the organization once you're sure in your candidate.

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