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5 Things to Try When You Feel Anxious at Work

Invest In Your Well-being

While you can’t control most of your environment, make it a point to change what you can.

Get enough sleep, avoid too much caffeine, work by a window with natural light, and control noise in your workspace with headphones.

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5 Things to Try When You Feel Anxious at Work

5 Things to Try When You Feel Anxious at Work

https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-coping-strategies-for-when-youre-feeling-anxious-at-work

themuse.com

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Key Ideas

Pay Attention To Your Triggers

Be aware of the situations that spike your anxiety (getting feedback, writing important emails, being put on the spot, or starting the day with a messy desk).

When you know what makes you the most uneasy, you can better anticipate challenges and create a plan to deal with triggers.

Prepare A Few Grounding Techniques

Anxiety activates the body’s fight or flight response, which sets off a number of uncomfortable reactions from sweating to tunnel vision. 

Calming yourself with grounding techniques (ways to stay in the present moment) can get you back in control. A few examples: meditation, stretching, calling a friend, or going for a walk.

Ask for What You Need

Consider making requests that’ll help you in the long term, like soliciting questions ahead of a presentation or asking your boss not to send you late-night emails unless it’s absolutely urgent.

Also, know your rights when it comes to managing your mental health (a flex schedule, additional time for assignments, and more frequent breaks).

Set Micro-Goals

Be careful to not overwhelm yourself. Setting realistic expectations for yourself is key to not only building positive momentum but also preserving your well-being.

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Many people think they work more hours than they actually do, leading to a mistaken belief that they are busier than they really are, something called the busyness delusion.

How To Modify Your Time Perception

You can increase the time perception by:

  1. Tracking your time: Use an app or a diary to track all your activities, keeping a secret but totally honest record of your time and figuring out the time leaks.
  2. Creating a schedule: Place meters on the time leaks found using the tracked time data and create a schedule that is tailored to your lifestyle.

People having a high perception of time have a ‘cockpit’ view of their time schedule and are able to set aside more time for leisure, and to be able to contemplate and reflect.

Use Your Schedule In Your Favour

Similar to a financial plan or a budget, the time schedule is not to restrict one’s day, but to support and enhance productivity during the day while ensuring there is ample time for the other areas of life.

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Specialize

Every field has its standards. Once you’ve got the basics down, reach for a lesser known—but still needed at your office—skill or competency.

Embrace conflict

Don’t create unnecessary conflict with your co-workers, but don’t run from it, either. See it as an opportunity to better understand someone you’ll be spending 40 hours a week around. 

Chances are, the other person will respond the same way. Goodwill is taken for granted less often than you might think.

Ask for help

At first, asking for help might sound like the opposite of creating your own opportunities. 

Opportunities are tied to personal relationships. Consider the Ben Franklin effect: By asking someone for a small favor, you endear them to yourself. The reason is that, when you help someone, your brain rationalizes your actions by assuming that you must like that person.

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