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7 Ground Rules for Dealing with Interpersonal Conflict at Work

Dealing with Interpersonal Conflict

  1. Acknowledge the conflict and look at it objectively.
  2. Open up the lines of communication and approach the conflict in the spirit of collaboration.
  3. Focus on the problem, not the other person.
  4. Stick to the facts.
  5. Meet face to face. It’s difficult to truly address a conflict virtually.
  6. Pick your battles. There’s only so much we can do.
  7. Make a decision and act on it.

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7 Ground Rules for Dealing with Interpersonal Conflict at Work

7 Ground Rules for Dealing with Interpersonal Conflict at Work

https://www.lifehack.org/846376/interpersonal-conflict

lifehack.org

4

Key Ideas

Interpersonal Issues

When it happens in the workplace, it can reduce productivity and make a dent in morale. 

It takes on the shape that one person, or a group of people, frustrates or hampers another person or group's efforts at achieving a goal. This isn’t always done on purpose.

Types of Interpersonal Conflict

  • Policy Conflicts: disagreements about how to deal with a situation that affects both parties. 
  • Value Conflicts: they are typically pretty difficult to resolve because they are more ingrained.
  • Ego Conflicts: losing an argument, or being thought of as wrong, can actually damage a person’s self-esteem. This is like a power struggle.

What Causes Interpersonal Conflict

  • Frustration and stress
  • Misunderstandings
  • Lack of planning
  • Bad staff selection
  • Poor Communication

Dealing with Interpersonal Conflict

  1. Acknowledge the conflict and look at it objectively.
  2. Open up the lines of communication and approach the conflict in the spirit of collaboration.
  3. Focus on the problem, not the other person.
  4. Stick to the facts.
  5. Meet face to face. It’s difficult to truly address a conflict virtually.
  6. Pick your battles. There’s only so much we can do.
  7. Make a decision and act on it.

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Effective Communication is vital in business
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  1. Using a One-Size-Fits-All Communication Approach. Tailor the communication style to the intended audience.
  2. Speaking More and Listening Less. Listen to what is said, how it is said, and to what is not said.
  3. Assuming Instead of Asking More Questions.
  4. Using Negative Tone. Choose words carefully to eliminate negative reactions.
  5. Avoiding Difficult Conversations.

  6. Reacting, Not Responding.

  7. Not Keeping an Open Mind. Accept and respect differences, listen without judgment and consider all sides of an issue.

Cut all the contact

Keep your distance and don’t text, email, meet in person or call.

Cutting the ties for good when it’s over puts you on a faster path to healing.

  • Set up an “Emergency ...
Let Your Emotions Out

Cry, sob your eyes out, scream and yell. As long as it doesn’t hurt yourself or anybody else, find ways to release and let go of the pain you may be feeling. 

Listen to sad songs. Listening to sad songs can regulate negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. 
Accept the fact that it’s over

Coping with the end of a relationship is a little bit like a 12 step program. You will reach acceptance far sooner by staying away from that person.

Don’t over-analyze what could have been different. Your mission now is to get to the place where you aren’t battling with yourself about the way things are. Do this with compassion and don’t beat yourself up.

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