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Our brain while listening to words

Our brain while listening to words

Our brain uses two separate areas to identify the mood and the real meaning of the words. Words are passed to the left temporal lobe of the brain for processing, and intonation is channelled to the right side of the brain, a region more stimulated by music.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

In order to have more meaningful conversations, ask questions that start with “who,” “what,” “where,” “when,” “how,” or “why”. 
Good: “What would you do?”
Bad: "Do you think I  should do X?"

  1. You - or your name. A person's name is the most important sound in any language.
  2. Free. All people naturally like to go for the free stuff.
  3. Because. Giving a reason, even a weak reason, is more persuasive than giving no reason.
  4. Instantly or ...

The 'to be' verbs like "she is, I am, they are" creates mental anguish because it reduces us to a single concept. X = Y  
"She is depressed"  or “I am a failure”.  
Accepting this language limits us to believe we are nothing more or less than the id...

Using too many adverbs - words to describe actions and objects - can make the reader lose interest.

The myth purports that we use 55% body language, 38% tone of voice and 7% actual words.

Smiling is one of the most powerful elements when thinking about speech.

The human brain can only hold on to four things at a time. It means that if you have a point to argue and continue for a long time, the person will remember very little of it.

Negative arguments have a harmful effect on our brain. 

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