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We all make snap first impressions about each other - here's how to slow down

The Five-Second Rule

Instead of unconsciously staring, and subsequently judging the other person, a better way is to consciously observe.

For five seconds, see the other person, without making assumptions, judgements or wrong impressions, and just observe neutrally.

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We all make snap first impressions about each other - here's how to slow down

We all make snap first impressions about each other - here's how to slow down

https://ideas.ted.com/we-all-make-snap-first-impressions-about-each-other-heres-how-to-slow-down/

ideas.ted.com

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Key Ideas

First Impressions

Usually, when we meet or see a person, we create a first impression in our minds, almost unconsciously.

But the snap judgements, or quick conclusions our mind starts to entertain in the first instance, can be drastically wrong.

The Receiving End

A snap judgement, or an unfair first impression can be a learning experience for the one who has made it, but it can also be a lifetime scar for the one on the receiving end, as it can stick with them.

The Stare

We have a natural instinct to stare at someone to gather information and categorize the person as safe or dangerous.

It is valid in some situations but it can also be hurtful and antagonizing to the other person.

The Five-Second Rule

Instead of unconsciously staring, and subsequently judging the other person, a better way is to consciously observe.

For five seconds, see the other person, without making assumptions, judgements or wrong impressions, and just observe neutrally.

Open and Aware

Use your awareness and follow the S.T.O.P. rule: "See The Other Person."

Looking at the other person is like stopping at a four-way intersection, where we need to observe, pausing for a moment, and then go forward.

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