Changing the lottery system - Deepstash

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The Psychology Of Lotteries

Changing the lottery system

There is clearly a demand for playing the lottery. But low-income people spend more of their income on the lottery than other income groups.

  • A solution would be to stop marketing and advertising lotteries that target the poor.
  • States could promote and offer more games that appeal to wealthier players.
  • Financial institutions could issue investment instruments that have lottery-like qualities.

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