What makes nutrition confusing - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Why Whole Wheat Is Better Than White

What makes nutrition confusing

The amount of fiber, minerals, antioxidants, and phytochemicals are just as important as the glycemic index.

What makes nutrition confusing is the news cycle and fad diet books warning against gluten and carbs, and the marketing of meaningless things like multigrain bread. The science, however, is not confusing.

44 SAVES


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Paleo concept

Humans evolved on a diet very different from today's eating habits. To be healthier, leaner, stronger and fitter, we must re-think our diet and remove some of the food groups we ...

What to eat
  • Animals (especially a "whole animal" approach, including organs, bone marrow, cartilage, and organs).
  • Animal products (such as eggs or honey).
  • Vegetables and fruits.
  • Raw nuts and seeds.
  • Added fats (like coconut oil, avocado, butter, ghee).
What to avoid
  • Grains, although research suggests eating whole grains improve our health and appear to be neutral when it comes to inflammation.
  • Heavily processed oils, such as canola and soybean oil.
  • Legumes, although research suggests the benefits of legumes outweigh their anti-nutrient content. Cooking eliminates most anti-nutrient effects. Some anti-nutrients may even be good.
  • Dairy.
Documented uses of the keto diet

Doctors have been prescribing ketogenic diets to treat epilepsy for nearly a century, and increasingly believe it holds promise for people with Type 2 diabetes.

But the older keto regi...

The Ketogenesis process

It supplies energy under circumstances such as fasting or caloric restriction to certain organs (e.g. the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle).

In ketogenesis, our livers start to break down fat into a usable energy source called ketones. Ketones can stand in for glucose as fuel for the body when there’s a glucose shortage. 

Once ketogenesis kicks in and ketone levels are elevated, the body is in a state called “ketosis,” during which it’s burning stored fat. 

The Keto diet
It is a very low-carb, high-fat diet. People on a ketogenic diet get 5 percent of their calories from carbohydrates, about 15 percent from protein, and 80 percent from fat. It’s this ratio that will force the body to derive much of its energy from ketones. 

That means eating mainly meats, eggs, cheese, fish, nuts, butter, oils, and vegetables while avoiding sugar, bread and other grains, beans, and even fruit.

Ketosis

... is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose (derived from sugars and starches) for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up o...

Fast facts on ketosis
  • Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose.
  • Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid.
  • In small amounts, ketones serve to indicate that the body is breaking down fat, but high levels of ketones can poison the body, leading to a process called ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal.
  • People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma.
  • Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores.
The ketogenic diet
The diet itself can be regarded as a high-fat diet, with around 75 % of calories derived from fats,  20 % from proteins and 5 % from carbohydrates.

Adhering to the ketogenic diet can lead to short-term weight loss, consuming fewer calories without feeling hungry while following the diet.