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Why Whole Wheat Is Better Than White

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/06/grains-and-mortality/486761/

theatlantic.com

Why Whole Wheat Is Better Than White
This is especially relevant, too, at a time when many people are needlessly avoiding gluten, or simply think that carbs are bad. "There is still some misconception about the role of carbohydrates in a healthy diet," said Frank Hu, a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard, and one of the study's authors.

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Multigrain is not wholegrain

The term "multigrain" is often used to imply wholesomeness, but the term is lacking. Containing the flour of multiple grains does not mean containing the flour of whole grains.

Wholegrain flour is when millers leave the grain intact before milling. It contains fiber that the pancreas and microbes demand for optimal performance.

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Carbohydrates in a healthy diet

Some people believe that all carbohydrates are bad. Others promote a very low carbohydrate diet.

However, an expansive analysis indicates that eating at least three servings of whole grains per day is associated with a lower risk of death from cancers, heart disease, and stroke.

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Whole grains or milled grains

Scientists speculate that when the whole grain is milled and becomes whole-wheat flour, the digestion and absorption process is still fast and can induce higher insulin responses.

Theoretically, milled grains are less beneficial than whole grains that are not processed.

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The absorption of starches

According to Harvard's website, the glycemic index of white bread and whole wheat bread is the same. The glycemic index depends mostly on the particle size of the food. When whole grains are milled, the particles are similar in size to those of white flour.

Thicker penne have a lower glycemic index than thinner penne. Pasta left al dente also has lower indices than pasta left to mush.

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What makes nutrition confusing

The amount of fiber, minerals, antioxidants, and phytochemicals are just as important as the glycemic index.

What makes nutrition confusing is the news cycle and fad diet books warning against gluten and carbs, and the marketing of meaningless things like multigrain bread. The science, however, is not confusing.

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It supplies energy under circumstances such as fasting or caloric restriction to certain organs (e.g. the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle).

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Once ketogenesis kicks in and ketone levels are elevated, the body is in a state called “ketosis,” during which it’s burning stored fat. 

The Keto diet

It is a very low-carb, high-fat diet. People on a ketogenic diet get 5 percent of their calories from carbohydrates, about 15 percent from protein, and 80 percent from fat. It’s this ratio that will force the body to derive much of its energy from ketones. 

That means eating mainly meats, eggs, cheese, fish, nuts, butter, oils, and vegetables while avoiding sugar, bread and other grains, beans, and even fruit.

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  • Animals (especially a "whole animal" approach, including organs, bone marrow, cartilage, and organs).
  • Animal products (such as eggs or honey).
  • Vegetables and fruits.
  • Raw nuts and seeds.
  • Added fats (like coconut oil, avocado, butter, ghee).

What to avoid

  • Grains, although research suggests eating whole grains improve our health and appear to be neutral when it comes to inflammation.
  • Heavily processed oils, such as canola and soybean oil.
  • Legumes, although research suggests the benefits of legumes outweigh their anti-nutrient content. Cooking eliminates most anti-nutrient effects. Some anti-nutrients may even be good.
  • Dairy.

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Foods that affect your sleep

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The relationship between diet and sleep

Researchers found that eating more saturated fat and less fibre from foods like vegetables, fruits, and whole grains led to reductions in slow-wave sleep - the deep restorative kind of sleep.

People who consume a high-carbohydrate diet fall asleep much faster at night, but the quality of carbs matters. People who eat simple carbs and sugar tend to wake up more frequently throughout the night while eating complex carbs that contain fibre may help you obtain more deep, restorative sleep. This is because complex carbohydrates provide a more stable blood sugar level.

Diet and sleep affect each other

As people lose sleep, they may seek out more junk food. Healthy adults who sleep only four or five hours a night end up eating more calories and snacking on sweet foods more frequently.

Another study found that proper sleep can increase your willpower to avoid unhealthy foods.