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How to Write a Perfect Resignation Letter

The resignation letter

A resignation letter should be short and unemotional. It is not the place to mention your frustrations or disappointments.

Your letter should be two to three sentences at most. It should indicate today's date, then confirm your decision to resign and when your last day of work will be. You might add a single sentence to fill it out.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Write a Perfect Resignation Letter

How to Write a Perfect Resignation Letter

https://www.thecut.com/article/resignation-letter.html

thecut.com

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Key Ideas

The purpose of a resignation letter

A resignation letter is not to announce your departure. It is documentation of your decision, not the main event.

Have your resignation conversation with your boss first, then formalize it with your written resignation.

The resignation letter

A resignation letter should be short and unemotional. It is not the place to mention your frustrations or disappointments.

Your letter should be two to three sentences at most. It should indicate today's date, then confirm your decision to resign and when your last day of work will be. You might add a single sentence to fill it out.

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