Managing self-inflicted stress - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

What is "self-inflicted stress"?

Managing self-inflicted stress

  • Use the 60-second method: Set aside 60 seconds of pause before doing anything in relation to what is stressing you out. Don't react.
  • Manage your time in a realistic way.
  • Ask for help and accept that you might not be able to accomplish everything on your own.
  • Acknowledge that your stress is mostly self-inflicted and make changes to fix that.

136 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

What is "self-inflicted stress"?

What is "self-inflicted stress"?

https://bigthink.com/personal-growth/self-inflicted-stress-management

bigthink.com

2

Key Ideas

Self-inflicted stress

It's the type of stress we force on ourselves through the way we manage our expectations, time, relationships and emotions. A few examples:
  • Putting pressure on yourself to excel at something within an unrealistic timespan.
  • Negative self-talk after not being able to complete something.
  • Not having enough time in the day to complete your "to-do" list.
  • An "all or nothing" attitude.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Our Seven Stress Personalities

Our personality greatly impacts how we handle stress. Different personalities cope with stress, depending on various factors.

The Seven stress personalities are The Pleaser, Time Keeper...

The Pleaser

This personality type wants all to be happy and can sacrifice one’s own interests for what’s best for the group. Pleasers can become resentful and may feel under-appreciated.

Pleasers need to prioritize their schedule and manage time in a more balanced way, getting more done for themselves.

The Timekeeper

This personality type likes to be in charge, and needs to feel competent and wanted. They take on too much and feel stressed out and anxious. They need to wait a few minutes before deciding to take any new responsibilities.

5 more ideas

Self-distancing

The act of increasing the psychological distance from your own subjective perspective when assessing events that you experience.

Is an external perspective that you can use when th...

Benefits of self-distancing
  • It can help people cope with difficult events from their past.
  • It can  help people deal with socially distressful situations.
  • Useful because of our tendency to display high levels of wise reasoning when we give advice to others, but not when we decide how to act for ourselves.
  • It reduces decisional biases and improves decision-making during times of information overload.
How to create self-distance
  • Use self-distancing language:  refer to yourself in the second or third-person.
  • Try to view the situation from an alternative viewpoint, that is different from your own.
  • Try to visualize the perspective of  someone you admire, and then ask yourself what would they do in that situation.
  • Try expressive writing: write about your thoughts and feelings when you’re trying to analyze an event that you’ve experienced.
What Emotional Fitness is

It's the idea that in order to lead healthy, happy emotional lives we need consistent habits and exercises that support our mental health and wellbeing.

The Benefits of Emotional Fitness
  • Decreased stress: you learn to manage your triggers.
  • Better communication in relationships: it helps you to tolerate and manage difficult emotions and then find more productive ways to work through difficulties.
  • Decreased anxiety: you train your mind to stop fearing its own emotional reactions.
  • You stick with your goals: you learn to deal with emotions like anxiety, shame, regret.
  • Increased self-awareness: you learn to build a better relationship with your emotions.
Get to know your emotions
  • Emotional clarity: Taking the time to deliberately reflect on our emotions, to observe and label them.
  • Emotional myth-busting: Eliminating myths and misconceptions floating around people’s minds about emotions. 
  • Emotional tolerance: Learning to resist short-term gratification and instead invest in long-term values.

one more idea