deepstash

Beta

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress Kit

Managing self-inflicted stress

  • Use the 60-second method: Set aside 60 seconds of pause before doing anything in relation to what is stressing you out. Don't react.
  • Manage your time in a realistic way.
  • Ask for help and accept that you might not be able to accomplish everything on your own.
  • Acknowledge that your stress is mostly self-inflicted and make changes to fix that.

@aiew_8oo

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Self-inflicted stress
It's the type of stress we force on ourselves through the way we manage our expectations, time, relationships and emotions. A few examples:
  • Putting pressure on yourself to excel at something within an unrealistic timespan.
  • Negative self-talk after not being able to complete something.
  • Not having enough time in the day to complete your "to-do" list.
  • An "all or nothing" attitude.

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

This personality type likes to be in charge, and needs to feel competent and wanted. They take on too much and feel stressed out and anxious. They need to wait a few minutes before deciding to take any new responsibilities.

8

IDEAS

  • Melancholia shows a clear pattern of symptoms and signs.
  • Sufferers experience a gloominess and have no desire to socialize.
  • They also lack energy and have difficulty concentrating.
  • Episodes typically appear from nowhere.
Pain And Evolution Of Consciousness

Emotion-related inputs from the body to the brain could have generated the first traces of consciousness in our early ancestors. Being able to feel pain gives a survival advantage to animals, as they could have withdrawn from dangers and rested to promote recovery when injured or ill.

The development of awareness of body-related harms might have ultimately paved the road for the emergence of more advanced forms of conscious thought and processes, such as language, thinking, and reasoning.