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Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things? The Puzzle of Altruism

Pure altruism

Acts of pure altruism do exist and they are most likely motivated by empathy and a feeling of interconnectedness (We can sense the suffering of other beings because, in a sense, we are them).

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things? The Puzzle of Altruism

Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things? The Puzzle of Altruism

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/out-the-darkness/201310/why-do-human-beings-do-good-things-the-puzzle-altruism

psychologytoday.com

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Key Ideas

Altruism and evolution

From an evolutionary point of view, altruism doesn’t seem to make any sense - human beings are basically selfish.
From a genetic point of view, it would make some sense to help the people close to us (relatives) to help our genes survive. But there is no real explanation for helping animals or those with no relation to us.

Egoic altruism

Some psychologists argue that there is no pure altruism, that we help strangers (or animals), there must always be some benefit to us, even if we’re not aware of it.
Maybe helping others makes us feel good about ourselves, we gain the respect of others, we may look more attractive to others, it makes us think we are going to Heaven, or that if we do good, good will be done to us.

Pure altruism

Acts of pure altruism do exist and they are most likely motivated by empathy and a feeling of interconnectedness (We can sense the suffering of other beings because, in a sense, we are them).

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