The 1918 influenza in numbers

The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States.
Mortality was high in people younger than 5 years old, 20-40 years old, and 65 years and older. The high mortality in healthy people, including those in the 20-40 year age group, was a unique feature of this pandemic.

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1918 Pandemic (H1N1 virus)

cdc.gov

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1918 Pandemic (H1N1 virus)

The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin.
We don't really know he virus originated, it spread worldwide during. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus.

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In the spring of 2009, a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged. It was detected first in the United States and spread quickly across the United States and the world. 

This new H1N1 virus contained a unique combination of influenza genes not previously identified in animals or people.

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2009 H1N1 Pandemic

cdc.gov

It is often referred to incorrectly as the “Spanish flu.” Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5% of the world’s population. Half a billion people were infected.
Misconceptions about it may be fueling unfounded fears about the new virus.

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10 misconceptions about the 1918 flu, the 'greatest pandemic in history'

theconversation.com

An epidemic is a broad term used to describe any problem that is actively spreading and has grown out of control.

The pandemic relates to geographic spread. It describes a disease that affects a whole country or the entire world.

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When Does an Epidemic Become a Pandemic?

verywellhealth.com