Talking about our problems - Deepstash

Talking about our problems

It can take a few forms:

  • Venting to a trusted friend: just let your feelings out, with no real plan for a solution.
  • Discussing a conflict with a partner: being able to be open about your feelings with your partner can make your communication healthier.
  • Talk therapy with a licensed therapist: a good one can help you hash out your emotions.
  • Being open about your struggles: sharing what daily life is like can help you and others with the same struggles realize that you’re not alone.

136 STASHED

MORE IDEAS FROM THEARTICLE

  • Choose the right people to talk to. And if you need a lot of talk time, try spreading your conversations out to multiple people.
  • Choose the right time to talk. Your friends may want to support you, but they have their own lives.
  • Find a therapist. If you have misconceptions about it, think of it less like seeing a doctor and more like a personal trainer.
  • Give yourself an endpoint. You may not be able to fix the external problem that is bothering you, but the goal should at least be to improve your mood about it.
  • Talk about the good as well as the bad. Be sure to share your good experiences and feelings when they come up. 

157 STASHED

1 LIKE

There are a lot of reasons talking about our problems can be difficult:

  • We may be educated to internalize feelings, rather than expressing them.
  • The emotions we're dealing with (guilt or shame) can feel so overwhelming that we can’t get up the motivation to talk about them.

149 STASHED

Research shows that putting your feelings into words can diminish the response of the amygdala (the part of the brain that handles your fight or flight response, among other things) when you encounter things that are upsetting. 

This in time makes you react with less stress when faced with the things that bother you.

144 STASHED

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

Your dreams may be ways of confronting emotional dramas in your life. 

Because your brain is operating at a much more emotional level than when you’re awake, your brain may make connections regarding your feelings that your conscious self wouldn’t make.

288 STASHED

4 LIKES

Fight or flight response

The fight or flight response (also known as the acute stress response), refers to a physiological reaction that occurs when we are in the presence of something that is mentally or physically terrifying.

  • The fight-or-flight response is triggered by the release of hormones that prepare your body to either stay and deal with a threat or to run away to safety.

The term "fight-or-flight" represents our ancient ancestors' choices when faced with danger in their environment.

  • The physiological and psychological response to stress prepares the body to react to the danger.

31 STASHED

14 LIKES

Fight Or Flight Response
  • Also known as Acute Stress Response, the fight-or-flight response is a physiological reaction when we are mentally or physically terrified.
  • A stressful or terrifying situation triggers hormones that prepare our body to stay or either deal with the problem or run away towards safety.
  • American physiologist Walter Cannon first described this basic stress response towards danger.

62 STASHED