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The Shock Cycle

The Shock Cycle: Dealing With Good News

The Shock Cycle: Dealing With Good News
  1. After accepting the bad news, you don't really see good news anymore or you ignore them altogether because you are nervous to report optimism in times of crisis.
  2. You then deny good news, because you think good news must be wrong or out of context.
  3. You realize you missed the good news, but only looking back and can’t believe how clear the signs of improvement were.
  4. You now accept the good news, realizing that risk has receded and you can once again enjoy the fruits of progress.
  5. You abandon your attachment to bad news as good news dominates the media and optimism becomes socially acceptable again.

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The Shock Cycle

The Shock Cycle

https://www.collaborativefund.com/blog/the-shock-cycle/

collaborativefund.com

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Key Ideas

The Shock Cycle: Dealing With Bad News

  1. You don’t see bad news (events are still small and aren't reported).
  2. You ignore the bad news because even once it’s reported it’s easy to dismiss if you’re not familiar with it.
  3. You deny the bad news because it's more comforting than admitting they’re about to hurt you.
  4. You panic at the bad news when you realize the threat is real.
  5. You accept the bad news and adapt to the new reality.

The Shock Cycle: Dealing With Good News

  1. After accepting the bad news, you don't really see good news anymore or you ignore them altogether because you are nervous to report optimism in times of crisis.
  2. You then deny good news, because you think good news must be wrong or out of context.
  3. You realize you missed the good news, but only looking back and can’t believe how clear the signs of improvement were.
  4. You now accept the good news, realizing that risk has receded and you can once again enjoy the fruits of progress.
  5. You abandon your attachment to bad news as good news dominates the media and optimism becomes socially acceptable again.

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