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Not much is happening in self-isolation. So why are you still so tired?

Screens

Screens

We are keeping ourselves mentally and physically exhausted at one go by staring at screens, as the blue light affects our eyes and brain, while the content affects our mind.

One idea is to just keep yourself updated with credible news sources once a day.

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Not much is happening in self-isolation. So why are you still so tired?

Not much is happening in self-isolation. So why are you still so tired?

https://bigthink.com/coronavirus/coronavirus-exhaustion

bigthink.com

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Key Ideas

Exhausted In Isolation

Due to the lockdown, tens of millions of people are sheltered at home, all across the world. There is a lack of routine, emotional insecurity, poor nutrition and alcohol/substance abuse, leading to a collective mental and physical exhaustion.

Fatigue can also happen even if your sleep is adequate, as it’s the isolation and the strange combination of boredom and anxiety that make us unhealthy.

Sun Therapy

If you can go outside, even for a walk around your home, make use of that. It is extremely important to get some sunlight absorption in your body, as it prevents depression and sluggishness while ensuring a healthy level of melatonin and serotonin in your brain.

Stay In The Routine

Having a new routine can be refreshing for a few days but it gets hard to maintain it.

It is imperative that we stick to a routine, shower, and dress every day, preferably waking up early, and at the same time.

Take Care of Your Diet

The lockdown has increased the sales of chips, popcorn, and processed food, while fresh produce (fruits and veggies) are rotting. 

Restricting high-calorie and sugary foods from your diet, while ensuring you don’t eat all day is the key to lose weight and gain energy. It would also be great to eat lots of green vegetables.

Alcohol

Alcohol and liquor sales have shot up around 65 percent during the pandemic, leading to many of those in lockdown experiencing disturbed sleep and hangovers.

It may not be easy to avoid alcohol altogether but is a good idea to minimize it. Switch to tea when you have a craving for alcohol while keeping yourself mentally occupied.

Screens

We are keeping ourselves mentally and physically exhausted at one go by staring at screens, as the blue light affects our eyes and brain, while the content affects our mind.

One idea is to just keep yourself updated with credible news sources once a day.

Conspiracy Theories

.. are affecting our mental health. It is better to take everything with a pinch of salt, and not to get carried away. Keep questioning the stories you hear and keep a sane mind.

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Eating before bed

It is important to leave at least a couple of hours between eating and sleeping. 

There is a whole raft of so-called sleepy foods – anything containing tryptophan, serotonin, melatonin, magnesium, calcium, potassium – often eaten in the hope they will aid sleep. 

If you do want to eat these foods, do it because it’s a nice ritual, not because you need it to sleep.

A cure for sleepwalking

There isn’t a cure. 

People who sleepwalk usually are advised to keep their room safe by locking windows and doors, and to maintain what’s called good sleep hygiene: keep to a regular sleep routine, turn mobile phones off, avoid stimulants, and so on. Sleepwalking can often occur as a result of poor or disrupted sleep.

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Keep in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle

  • Try to go to sleep and get up at the same time every day;
  • Avoid sleeping in, even on weekends;
  • Limit naps to 15 to 20 minutes in the early afternoon;

Melatonin

Is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure that helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle. 

Your brain secretes more melatonin when it’s dark, making you sleepy, and less when it’s light, making you more alert. 

However, many aspects of modern life can alter your body’s production of melatonin and shift your circadian rhythm

Influence exposure to ligh

During the day:

  • Expose yourself to bright sunlight in the morning. 
  • Spend more time outside during daylight. 
  • Let as much natural light into your home or workspace as possible.

At night:

  • Avoid bright screens within 1-2 hours of your bedtime.
  • Say no to late-night television.
  • Don’t read with backlit devices. 
  • When it’s time to sleep, make sure the room is dark.
  • Keep the lights down if you get up during the night.

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Slow-wave sleep (deep sleep) – SWS

About 80% of our sleeping is of the SWS variety, identified by slow brain waves, relaxed muscles and deep breathing.

Deep sleep is important for the consolidation of memories. New experience...

Rapid eye movement (dreaming) - REM

Dreaming accounts for 20% of our sleeping time.

The length of dreams can vary from a few seconds to almost an hour. During REM sleep, the brain is highly active. The muscles are paralyzed, and the heart rate increases. Breathing can become erratic. 

Sleep quantity

Although eight hours is the common mention, optimum sleep can vary from person to person and from age to age.

One review that worked through 320 research articles concluded 7 - 9 hours of sleep are enough for adults. According to experts, too little or too much sleep can both have a negative impact on your health.

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