Employee Retention - Deepstash

Employee Retention

If an employee lives alone, allowing the dog to come to the office, who otherwise may be sitting at home waiting for the owner all day, leads to the employee to feel satisfied in the job. 

This small gesture takes a lot of mental load off the employee and makes them stay in the organization.

2

STASHED IN:

31

MORE IDEAS FROM 5 Surprising Benefits of Bringing Dogs In The Workplace

Dogs At The Workplace

More and more employers are starting to realize the value of allowing dogs in the workplace.
Dogs have the power to increase employee engagement and inspire productivity. Even if this sounds unconvincing, take a look at the five surprising benefits of bringing dogs in your workplace.

2

STASHED IN:

50

A dog-friendly work environment is beneficial while recruiting for new talent, and gives a competitive edge to the employer.

It adds to the fun culture in the office, and friendlier environment, making the workplace a great place to work.

2

STASHED IN:

37

Dogs Encourage Communication

Pets are generally common interest among many people and can be an icebreaker among the staff, especially newcomers and introverts. 

Team communication of the casual variety can be extremely productive in the long run.

3

STASHED IN:

32

Many of us end up spending too much time sitting at work, forgetting about anything else. Bringing a dog can help.

Dogs make the owner have a healthier lifestyle, as they have to wake up early to take the dog at work, and also go to sleep on time. In the office, they take the dog outside for a walk a few times in the day, promoting good health.

3

STASHED IN:

50

Dogs are an instant mood booster and can help unwind the brain when the work is hectic and demanding due to deadlines and other kinds of work pressure.

2

STASHED IN:

32

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEA

The 1950s workplace - the open-plan office

At first, office layouts were influenced by the production or factory line. Rows of desks fitted tightly together, but managers and executives had private offices with windows so they could supervise workers.

In the 1950s, the workplace design style became less rigid. The emphasis was placed on meeting the needs of the workforce with a more fluid design. It resulted in a more social environment where collaboration between teams increased.

2

STASHED IN:

47

Makers and managers

Paul Graham’s 2009 essay, “Maker’s Schedule, Manager’s Schedule”, describes the differences that lead these these two factions to clash:

  • “The manager’s schedule is for bosses. It’s embodied in the traditional appointment book, with each day cut into one hour intervals."
  • On the other hand, makers operate effectively on a different schedule entirely — one that prioritizes focus: “…there’s another way of using time that’s common among people who make things. They generally prefer to use time in units of half a day at least. You can’t write or program well in units of an hour. That’s barely enough time to get started. "

76

STASHED IN:

300

STASHED IN:

0 Comments

Before the Industrial revolution, everyone worked out of their home and sold their goods from there. With the Industrial Revolution came the need for automation and factories, and employees had to commute to a factory to complete their work.

1

STASHED IN:

137