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Why Feeling Close to the Finish Line Makes You Push Harder

Offering Free Bonus Points

Studies show that if a person is offered a bonus reward or push, he or she is more likely to complete the goal as he has been provided with a further incentive and help to reach a stage where his reward is within his sights.

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Why Feeling Close to the Finish Line Makes You Push Harder

Why Feeling Close to the Finish Line Makes You Push Harder

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-feeling-close-to-the-finish-line-makes-you-push-harder/

scientificamerican.com

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Key Ideas

The Goal Gradient Hypothesis

The Goal Gradient hypothesis states that we push harder or are motivated to exert more by the fact that the goal is almost within reach.

The knowledge that the desired outcome or reward is almost attained is a ‘pull factor’ in our effort.

The "Buy Ten Get One Free" Line

Marketers use this to nudge us towards buying a certain product or service, providing us with a goal that is almost within our grasp.

Example: When enrolled in a buy ten get one free coffee program, the person who has just one coffee to complete ten, is motivated to buy it as the free coffee is now imminent.

Understanding The Psychology of a Goal Gradient

This helps us manage our motivation, as it focuses our energy and motivation.

The downside is that we are focused on the goal in front of us and are now shortsighted or blinded with regards to other future goals which may be important.

Detached Goal Setting

A great way to manage your projects and goals is to have a detached mindset about them while trying to sort and prioritize them.

After the sorting, take the most important goals from the list and figure out ways to make them more immediate and attainable.

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