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Full Moon Insomnia: Does The Moon Affect Your Sleep?

The Transylvania Effect

The academic literature in the 90s termed the effect of the lunar cycle on humans and even entire populations as the Transylvania Effect.

This is the belief that the moon produces psychological and physiological disturbances in the body and mind and can also be found in ancient literature.

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Full Moon Insomnia: Does The Moon Affect Your Sleep?

Full Moon Insomnia: Does The Moon Affect Your Sleep?

https://www.nosleeplessnights.com/full-moon-insomnia/

nosleeplessnights.com

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Key Ideas

Full Moon Insomnia And Weird Behaviors

Despite the lack of scientific evidence, many people believe in the moon's ability to change their behaviour and hold an uncanny power over them.

Hospitals, police stations and emergency phone lines report a big surge of cases on full moon nights, and they all cannot be wrong every time.

Medical Beliefs And Moon Influences

A study published in The World Journal Of Surgery in 2011 explicitly pointed out that more than 40 per cent of medical staff is convinced that the lunar phases affect human behaviour.

This was later ‘debunked’ as subjective, citing a scientific analysis.

The Transylvania Effect

The academic literature in the 90s termed the effect of the lunar cycle on humans and even entire populations as the Transylvania Effect.

This is the belief that the moon produces psychological and physiological disturbances in the body and mind and can also be found in ancient literature.

Lunacy

  • A full moon causes heavy dew in the brain, according to Pliny the Elder, a Roman author, naturist and philosopher. A moist brain then behaves in a ‘lunatic’ manner. The word lunatic, of course, refers to our moon, which is called Luna.
  • Monseoc, another English word for lunatic, literally translates into ‘moon sick.’

Ancient Calendars And Lunar Cycles

Ancient calendars were based on the lunar cycles, with every new moon indicating a new phase.

The ancient agricultural societies had good use of the moon calendar, planning and arranging their crop harvest accordingly.

The Moon And Our Sleep

A 2013 research on a different topic retroactively reanalysed the sleep patterns of participants and combined them with the moon cycle to see if the moon is affecting the sleep pattern. They concluded that the lunar phase does influence human sleep, and works like gravity.

Many studies have continuously debunked the findings of sleep patterns being affected by the moon, but the fact is that the moon exerts a tidal force on water, and can very well have an effect on humans, even though it is not measurable scientifically.

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The Science of Sleep

The average adult spends 36 % (or about one-third) of his or her life asleep.

Purpose of Sleep:

  • Restoration
  • Memory Consolidation
  • Metabolic Health
Restoration

The first purpose of sleep is restoration.

Every day, your brain accumulates metabolic waste as it goes about its normal neural activities. Sleeping restores the brains healthy condition by removing these waste products. Accumulation of these waste products has been linked to many brain-related disorders.

Memory Consolidation

The second purpose of sleep is memory consolidation.

Sleep is crucial for memory consolidation, which is responsible for your long term memories. Insufficient or fragmented sleep can hamper your ability to remember facts and feelings/emotions.

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5 hours of sleep is enough

Habitual sleep deprivation is associated with diverse and far-reaching health effects and none of them is good.

Between 7 and 9 hours of sleep per night are recommended. You can get used to l...

Watching Television before bed

Cellphones, tablets, and all kinds of personal electronics are not a good idea when you’re getting ready for bed.

Researchers have increasingly focused on “blue light” emitted by screens and its effect on sleep and negative sleep-related health outcomes.

It doesn’t matter when you sleep

Our bodies tend to follow a natural rhythm of wakefulness and sleep that is attuned to sunrise and sunset for a reason.

While some missed sleep here and there isn’t necessarily a big deal, shifting your sleep schedule long term isn’t healthy.

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The necessary amount of sleep
The necessary amount of sleep

Most adults function best after 7-9 hours of sleep a night.

When we get less than 7 hours, we’re impaired (to degrees that vary from person to person).  When sleep persistently fa...

Polyphasic sleeping

It's based on the idea that by partitioning your sleep into segments, you can get away with less of it.

Though it is possible to train oneself to sleep in spurts instead of a single nightly block, it does not seem possible to train oneself to need less sleep per 24-hour cycle.

Replacing sleep with caffeine

Caffeine works primarily by blocking the action of a chemical called adenosine, which slows down our neural activity, allowing us to relax, rest, and sleep.

By interfering with it, caffeine cuts the brake lines of the brain’s alertness system. Eventually, if we don’t allow our body to relax, the buzz turns to anxiety.

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