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How to Brainstorm — Remotely

Determine who is involved in the brainstorm

Determine who is involved in the brainstorm

Identify the roles and expertise you want, and then find people who fit that description. This will help you ensure that the group you bring together is more diverse, bringing a range of different backgrounds and perspectives to the problem-solving task.

Prior to the pandemic, it was a hurdle for people with broad and diverse perspectives to be in the same room, physically together. With remote work, it is easier to bring in people having a range of different backgrounds and perspectives to sit together remotely and brainstorm on the task at hand.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Brainstorm — Remotely

How to Brainstorm — Remotely

https://hbr.org/2020/07/how-to-brainstorm-remotely

hbr.org

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Key Ideas

Determine who is involved in the brainstorm

Identify the roles and expertise you want, and then find people who fit that description. This will help you ensure that the group you bring together is more diverse, bringing a range of different backgrounds and perspectives to the problem-solving task.

Prior to the pandemic, it was a hurdle for people with broad and diverse perspectives to be in the same room, physically together. With remote work, it is easier to bring in people having a range of different backgrounds and perspectives to sit together remotely and brainstorm on the task at hand.

The groupthink theory

It shows that, during part of the sessions that involves idea generation, individuals think differently about a problem if they work alone. But when you bring the group together to generate ideas, they tend to think alike, converging on a common solution.

So start your brainstorming process by having each person generate potential solutions on their own, or perhaps have them work in small groups to think about possibilities.

The construal-level theory

Distance, whether physical, time-oriented, or social, makes the human mind think in an abstract manner. This is known as the construal-level theory.

Being physically distant from the problem at hand makes our viewpoint abstract, which can help us provide a birds-eye view of the problem and associate it with our own area of expertise, forming useful analogies and connections.

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Steps to Successful Brainstorming
  1. Lay out the problem you want to solve.
  2. Identify the objectives of a possible solution.
  3. Try to generate solutions individually.
  4. Once you have gotten...
Before heading into a group brainstorming session...

... organizations should insist that staffers first try to come up with their own solutions. 

One problem with group brainstorming is that when we hear someone else’s solution to a problem, we tend to see it as what  an “anchor - we get stuck on that objective and potential solution to the exclusion of other goals.

Only after participants have done their homework ...

... meaning clarifying the problem, identifying objectives, and individually trying to come up with solutions, a brainstorming session can be extremely productive.

The Eureka Myth
The Eureka Myth

There is a big misconception that ideas generate like a flash.

Researches show that such insights are actually the culminating result of prior hard work on a problem. Itt&#...

The Breed Myth

A lot of people think that creative ability is a trait inherent in one’s heritage or genes. In fact, there is no such thing as a creative breed.

Creative minds are not born, they are made. People who have confidence in themselves and work the hardest on a problem are the ones most likely to come up with a creative solution.

The Originality Myth

There's a long-standing myth about intellectual property - the idea that a creative idea is proprietary to the person who thought of it.

But history and empirical research revealed that new ideas are actually combinations of older ideas and that sharing those helps generate more innovation.

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When to Use Icebreakers

Consider using an ice breaker when:

  • Participants come from different backgrounds.
  • People need to bond quickly so as to work towards a common goal.
  • Your team ...
The "ice" that needs to be broken

When designing your ice breaker, think about the "ice" that needs to be broken.

  • If you are bringing together like-minded people, the "ice" may simply reflect the fact that people have not yet met.
  • If you are bringing together people of different backgrounds, cultures, and outlooks for work within your community, then the "ice" may come from people's perceptions of each other.

Designing Your Ice Breaker
  • Make sure that the activity is specifically focused on meeting your objectives and appropriate to the group of people involved.
  • Clarify the specific objectives for your session.
  • Ask yourself questions about how you will meet your objectives
  • These questions can be used as a checklist once you have designed the session
  • As a further check, ask yourself how each person is likely to react to the session.

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