“Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won’t come in.” - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

The Culture Bubble — Why You Stop Seeing Clearly and Start Acting Foolishly

Alan Alda

“Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won’t come in.”

Alan Alda

44 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Culture Bubble — Why You Stop Seeing Clearly and Start Acting Foolishly

The Culture Bubble — Why You Stop Seeing Clearly and Start Acting Foolishly

https://medium.com/swlh/the-culture-bubble-why-you-stop-seeing-clearly-and-start-acting-foolishly-13baf38e7c64

medium.com

5

Key Ideas

The culture bubble

A culture bubble normalizes the good and bad of your company culture and slowly alter your perception. Your judgment ceases to be as sharp, and you stop asking questions. You may downplay its strengths and tolerate outdated or dysfunctional behaviors.

The longer people belong to a team, the more prone they are to getting trapped inside that culture. You may compete with your colleagues instead of other companies. After a while, it starts to feel normal. You may play it safe. After some time, it feels normal.

The unwritten rules of a culture bubble

Unwritten rules are never formally agreed on. They emerge when we face a problem together and find a solution that gets the job done. Everyone shares the unwritten agreement and expects everyone to comply.

The unwritten rules become more powerful when the reason they came into use in the first place is no longer valid. Without hard evidence that what we are doing makes logical sense, we are forced to make things up.

Shared beliefs of a culture bubble

It's not hard evidence that gives us our sense of certainty. Its the feedback of our peers that guides us to tell right from wrong.

We all have beliefs we feel passionate about. Perhaps it is that all animals deserve to be treated with compassion and respect. When someone forces us to act against our beliefs, we will feel our emotions rise. It is because our beliefs are deeply intertwined with our feelings. When our beliefs are threatened, we feel compelled to defend it.

The habituation of a culture bubble

Habituation occurs when you grow accustomed to stimuli that happen repeatedly. The loud fridge, but you will later become used to it. People always being late for meetings can make you angry at first, but later on, you are not bothered by it.

Habituation has nothing to do with common sense or approval. We become habituated because "that is the way things work around here."

Alan Alda

Alan Alda

“Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won’t come in.”

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Different Psychologies
Different Psychologies

Psychology, which was largely developed in North American and Europe, has largely been able to understand human behavior and mental processes.

As our knowledge of different cultures and thou...

The Right Representation

Normally, studies conducted to understand human behavior have participants representing the wider human population, which may be true in a certain geography but isn't accurate when we take into account other cultures and demographics.

More than 90% of the participants in psychological studies originate from countries that are Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic (W.E.I.R.D) which is neither a random sample nor a real representation of the human population.

Different Ways Of Being

People across the world have different ways of describing themselves, different mental associations and thinking styles, possessing radically diverse motivations, upbringing, and social relationships.

What may be categorized as a mental illness in a certain part of the world may be normal behavior in another. Cultural differences pervade in a wider array of human behavior and there is a need to increase the circumference and scope of these studies.

Living in the age o doubt
Living in the age o doubt

We live in a time when all scientific knowledge (the safety of fluoride, vaccines, climate change, moon landing, etc.) faces coordinated and vehement resistance.

The acces...

We now face risks we can’t easily analyze

Our existence is invaded by science and technology as never before. For many of us, this brings comfort and rewards, but this existence is also more complicated and sometimes agitated.

Our lives are full of real and imaginary risks, and distinguishing between them isn’t easy. We have to be able to decide what to believe and how to act on that.

Marcia McNutt  - Geophysicist
Marcia McNutt - Geophysicist

“Science is not a body of facts. Science is a method for deciding whether what we choose to believe has a basis in the laws of nature or not.”

6 more ideas

The 3 levels of a company culture
  • Artifacts - things you can see, touch, smell: Ping pong tables, happy hours, and free lunches.
  • Espoused values and beliefs - the mission statement you wrote togethe...
Shifting a company's culture
What people truly believe , not always what you say or outwardly show,  is what drives a company’s culture.

Changing a company culture is about tapping into the core beliefs of each individual, understanding what their basic underlying assumptions are, and creating an environment where those can be listened to, brought together, and reacted to.

People that cause grief
People that cause grief

We all know a few people that cause grief, not merely because they have a bad day but because they have severe problems and are unwilling to change.

We can learn enough to recognize i...

High-conflict people (HCP)
  1. Narcissistic HCPs: They may seem charming at first but think themselves to be superior. They insult, humiliate, mislead, and lack empathy while demanding respect and attention.
  2. Borderline HCPs: They start out friendly but can suddenly change into being extremely angry. During this rage, they may seek revenge for minor insults.
  3. Antisocial (or Sociopathic/Psychopathic) HCPs There extreme charm is a cover for their drive to dominate others through lying, stealing, publicly humiliating people, physically injuring them, and sometimes murdering them.

While these are disorders and these people are suffering, mental health professionals would advise you to keep your distance from them, if at all possible.

Behavior Patterns Of HCP

Everybody has bad days or weeks. To tell if someone is a High Conflict Person, we can look for four traits of behavior.

  1. Lots of all-or-nothing thinking: When problems arise, it is their solution or no solution. They don't compromise or listen to different points of view.
  2. Intense or unmanaged emotions: HCPs become very emotional about their points of view. Their responses are out of proportion to whatever is happening.
  3. Extreme behavior or threats: They engage in extreme negative behavior that includes physical harm, spreading lies about someone else, emotional manipulation, or obsessive contact.
  4. A preoccupation with blaming others: They frequently blame other people close to them or people in authority over them.

Nobody is perfect, but if someone has all four traits, they almost certainly are an HCP.

5 more ideas

The Common Cold

With over 200 different kinds of viruses that make up the common cold, Science is struggling to find a cure.

Adults suffer this elusive, widespread, and infectious disease 2 to 4 times...

The 7 Identified Virus Families

Scientists to date have identified seven virus families that cause the majority of colds:

  • rhinovirus
  • the new 2019
  • influenza
  • parainfluenza
  • adenovirus
  • respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)
  • metapneumovirus.
Vaccines vs Drugs

For Doctors, vaccines are preferable to drugs as they protect the host even before any infection.

For Pharmaceutical companies (Big Pharma), vaccines don't spell money, as much as over-the-counter drugs and treatment do.

one more idea

The 4 components of effective communication:
  • Observing what is happening in a situation (such as someone saying or doing something you don't like).
  • Stating how you feel when you observe the action.
  • Expres...
Observing without evaluating

Good communicators are able to separate their observations of a situation from their evaluations or judgments of it.

For example,  "Janice works too much" contains an evaluation: working too much is subjective, and if Janice heard that, she may take it as criticism and become defensive. Saying "Janice spent more than 60 hours at the office this week" is an observation without any judgments attached.

Strengthening our vocabulary for feelings

When you're expressing your feelings, it's better to use words that refer to specific emotions rather than words that are vague and general. 

Don't say you feel "good" when words like happy, excited, relieved, or anything else could describe how you feel more precisely.

Cultural Intelligence (CQ)
Cultural Intelligence (CQ)
  • After IQ and EQ, Cultural Intelligence (CQ) is a new type of intelligence on the rise due to globalization and a complex, competitive and dynamic business environment.
  • Emp...
The Three Components Of Cultural Intelligence

Cultural Intelligence (CQ) is a system comprising of three well-connected components:

  1. Cultural Knowledge: The content and process knowledge of the various cultures.
  2. Cross-cultural Skills: A wide range of skills that pertain to the various facets of a culture, like relational, tolerance of uncertainty and ambiguity, adaptability, empathy, and the ability to understand other people's feelings.
  3. Cultural Metacognition: Also called cultural mindfulness, is the art of being aware of the cultural context, the subtleties of various situations, and the kind of strategies that can be taken.
How To Develop Cultural Knowledge

One can develop cultural knowledge through newspapers, movies, travelling to various countries, and interacting officially or personally with people of different cultures, learning new traditions, customs, cuisines, and rich new ways to live life.

One can identify and analyse the different cultures and utilize the knowledge in future.

2 more ideas

Every Decision In Life Becomes a Trade-Off
Every Decision In Life Becomes a Trade-Off

... and boils down to what we give up to attain something. Our mindsets are inclined towards pleasure and resistive towards pain. We normally like to think in terms of gai...

Good and Bad Decisions

Decisions are a cost-benefit analysis of risking something small for the opportunity to gain something big.

  • Good decisions can be: Exercising, meditating for 10 minutes daily, finding the courage and striking up a conversation with someone, applying for jobs that you may or may not get.
  • Bad decisions can be: lying or pretending to someone, driving unsafely, sending angry text messages, or staying up late drinking before an important meeting or exam in the morning.
Trade-offs and Life Values

Trade-offs are not something as simple as flipping a coin. Our values guide us towards what we want in life, and it is not the same for all. Example: Buying a house has a trade-off of mortgage for the next ten or more years. This is subjective and depends on what we value in life.

Indecisive people suffer because they don’t know their inner values and what they care about.

6 more ideas

The concept of servant leadership
The actual term for a leader who upends the power pyramid to put others' needs first was introduced by Robert Greenleaf in his influential 1970 essay "The Servant As Leader" in 1970.
The 6 main principles of servant leadership
  1. Empathy. Give trusted co-workers the benefit of the doubt by assuming the good in them. It goes a long way toward instilling loyalty and trust in you from your team.
  2. Awareness. Care deeply about the welfare of the team members. Don't view them only as cogs in a machine.
  3. Building community. Build community where both employees and customers can thrive.
  4. Persuasion. Rely on persuasion rather than coercion to create internal motivation required to complete the task effectively.
  5. Conceptualization. Servant-leading entrepreneurs focus on the big picture and don't get overly distracted by daily operations and short-term goals.
  6. Growth. Care passionately about the personal and professional growth of each member of the team.