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The Competency Trap: How Smart People Sabotage Their Careers

The Competency Trap

The Competency Trap

Many people fall into the competency trap, which is the assumption that their established principles and mental models, that have served them all these years, will be sufficient in the future too.

They rely on familiar tools, skills and routines, getting into their comfort zone in the false belief that they don’t need to upgrade or change in this increasingly complex and competitive world, where change is the only constant.

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The Competency Trap: How Smart People Sabotage Their Careers

The Competency Trap: How Smart People Sabotage Their Careers

https://medium.com/kaizen-habits/the-competency-trap-how-smart-people-sabotage-their-careers-46cf3d9c8e13

medium.com

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Key Ideas

The Competency Trap

Many people fall into the competency trap, which is the assumption that their established principles and mental models, that have served them all these years, will be sufficient in the future too.

They rely on familiar tools, skills and routines, getting into their comfort zone in the false belief that they don’t need to upgrade or change in this increasingly complex and competitive world, where change is the only constant.

When Core Competencies Become Core Rigidities

  • When we overcommit to our core competencies they become our only reality.
  • We start to see the business world outside with the same internal view that has been harnessed for so many years when we strengthened and relied on the same skills.
  • We strive hard to attain mastery in our core skills, but forget to incorporate other skills, habits and mental models that are required for us to thrive in the future.

The Importance Of Disrupting Yourself

  • One must continuously learn new alternatives, skills and approaches to work and nurture one’s innovative spirit, becoming a competitor to oneself.
  • One has to look for gaps, areas of improvement and new market realities.
  • One must invest time, money, energy and attention towards new methods, techniques and tools that help us innovate, reinvent and upgrade ourselves.
  • One can take time to analyze one’s life and career, reviewing and reflecting on the strategies that are incorporated to improve oneself.

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