The conservation of complexity - Deepstash

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Why Life Can’t Be Simpler

The conservation of complexity

To do a difficult thing in the simplest way, we need a lot of options. When looking an any set of tools for a task, such as a digital photo editing program, a novice will see complexity. A professional sees a range of different tools, each of which is easy to use. They know how to use each option to make a task easier. Without an array of options, the task will be more complicated.

Complexity is a constant. It cannot be eliminated, only moved somewhere else. When something looks simple to use, it can be very complex inside. When something is simple inside, it can result in a complex surface.

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