Self-Education: The Way Of The Future - Deepstash

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Self-education: how to leverage the end of credentialism - Ness Labs

Self-Education: The Way Of The Future

Self-Education: The Way Of The Future

Self-learning (also known as autodidacticism) is useful for certification (and fine-tuning) of your existing skills, to be able to learn continuously, and for the cultivation of your curiosity.

It’s essential to move out of the comfort zone and dive into the learning zone.

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Neuroeducation
Neuroeducation

Neuroscientists explore the biology behind processes such as the formation of memories, creative processes, etc.

Neuroeducation is a recent discipline that draws together ...

The main applications of neuroeducation
  • Attention. To learn, we need to be able to focus on some aspects while ignoring or excluding others. For example, reading this paragraph while ignoring the noise around you.
  • Memory. Knowing how memory works and how you can make learning more efficient can increase your performance. Science-based techniques include interleaving and chunking.
  • Executive control. Being able to plan, to create a sequence of steps, and to retain important information for short periods. While most happens in the prefrontal cortex, lots of research is needed to understand how executive control works.
  • Social behaviour. Social Neuroscience is aiming to understand how our biology affects our social behaviours.
  • Neurodiversity. Conditions such as ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), dyscalculia (difficulty with arithmetical calculations), and dyslexia impact learning. Neuroeducation aims to understand how these conditions best adapt to the learning environment.
Learning: In the classroom and beyond

Learning starts in childhood and continues into adulthood. Some learning happens in our spare time, and a lot in the workplace.

Many of the current applications of neuroeducation in the classroom are usable in the workplace. Since $80 billion is spent every year on corporate training in the United States, we need to ensure training interventions are effective. Neuroeducation could provide an answer, ensuring employees understand how the brain thinks, learn, and make decisions.

Metacognition
Metacognition

Metacognition means “thinking about thinking” or “knowing about knowing.” The word “metacognition” means “above cognition”.

It’s translate into being aware of your own awar...

Components that make up metacognition
  • Metacognitive knowledge: What you know about yourself and others in terms of thinking and learning processes.
  • Metacognitive regulation: The methods you use to control your learning.
  • Metacognitive experiences: The thoughts and feelings you have during your learning process.
Metacognitive knowledge categories
  • Declarative knowledge: the knowledge you have about your learning style and about what the factors that influence you.
  • Procedural knowledge: what you know about learning in general - strategies you found or that you have already applied.
  • Conditional knowledge: it refers to knowing when and why you should use declarative and procedural knowledge.
Convergent and divergent thinking
Convergent  and divergent thinking
  • Convergent thinking. When we want to solve a problem, we tend to look for useful facts to guide us to the correct answer. This type of thinking works well when the problem i...
Divergent thinking and playfulness

Research found that divergent thinking is linked to playfulness and creativity.

Children who play more tend to display curiosity, persistence, nonconformity, and a willingness to take risks. These are important characteristics for innovative solutions.

Divergent thinking can be practiced
  • Mind mapping helps your brain work by association. Start in the centre and add notes, connecting branches together.
  • Brainstorming. Generate as many ideas as possible.
  • Free writing. Focus on the question and write without stopping for a specified time.
  • Journaling. It helps to clarify your thinking while producing new ideas.
  • Art. Doodling, painting, creating graphs and illustrations will help you think outside the box.
  • Role playing. Putting yourself in the shoes of a different character is a good way to practice divergent thinking.