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Self-education: how to leverage the end of credentialism - Ness Labs

https://nesslabs.com/self-education

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Self-education: how to leverage the end of credentialism - Ness Labs

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Self-Education: The Way Of The Future

Self-Education: The Way Of The Future

Self-learning (also known as autodidacticism) is useful for certification (and fine-tuning) of your existing skills, to be able to learn continuously, and for the cultivation of your curiosity.

It’s essential to move out of the comfort zone and dive into the learning zone.

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The Learning Loop

The Learning Loop

Self-learning is about goals and the meaning you derive out of your work, though it can also work without a goal, only for self-satisfaction.

The Learning Loop is as follows:

  1. Identification of the goal, where we research about what are the requirements.
  2. Devising a learning strategy.
  3. Practice with consistency and resilience.
  4. Ensure you get adequate feedback about your progress.

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Mindframing For Self-Education

Mind Framing or the personal growth framework uses the PARI method:

  1. Pact: A public commitment to learning something new.
  2. Act: Studying, practicing and experimenting.
  3. React: Sharing of progress and building of projects.
  4. Impact: Work towards something new using the acquired skill and move towards a new pact.

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Stepping Away From Credentialism

The world is already moving towards direct acquisition of skills and away from credentials. Companies are increasingly okay with self-learned, skilled employees that get the job done.

Many online resources like Coursera, edX.org, Udemy and others can open new doors in our lives and provide us with new skills if we can take the plunge.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Ordinary and altered states of consciousness

Ordinary and altered states of consciousness

Altered states of consciousness can only be defined if there is an understanding of an ordinary state of consciousness.

While scientists can't agree on a clear definition, alte...

Modulating states of consciousness

  • Excessive dancing, meditation, and mind-altering plants were used in ancient civilizations to modulate the activity of the mind.
  • In 1892, the term "altered states of consciousness" was used to refer to hypnosis.
  • William James introduced the scientific investigation of mystical experiences and drug-induced states into the field of psychology.

The five altered states of consciousness

  • Pharmacological. These altered states include short-term changes caused by psychoactive substances, such as LSD MDMA, cannabis, cocaine, opioids, and alcohol.
  • Psychological. Hypnosis, meditation, and music can lead to altered mental states.
  • Physical and physiological. An altered state of consciousness is achieved through sleep, where dreams dissociate one from reality.
  • Pathological. A traumatic experience causing brain damage can lead to an altered state of consciousness. Other sources include epileptic or psychotic episodes.
  • Spontaneous. Daydreaming and mind wandering can cause altered states.

Our values

Our values

Our values are our preferences about what we consider appropriate courses of actions.

They strongly influence our decisions. Therefore we should take the time to consider w...

The transmission of values

Personal values can be ethical, moral, ideological, social, or even aesthetic. Values are mostly transmitted through parenting, but our cultural environment also plays a role.

For instance, American parents tend to value intellectual knowledge; Swedish parents value security and happiness; and Dutch parents value independence and the ability to stick to a schedule.

The four personal value orientations

There are four different personal value orientations based on our "terminal values " - our desirable states of existence, and "instrumental values" - the means by which we achieve our end goals.

  1. Personal-competence. "I value wisdom (terminal), which I believe can be achieved through independent thinking (instrumental)."
  2. Personal-moral: "I valued true friendship (terminal), which I believe can be achieved through honesty (instrumental)."
  3. Social-competence: "I valued equality (terminal), which I think can be achieved through ambitious work (instrumental)."
  4. Social-moral: "I value national security (terminal), which I believe can be achieved through obedience (instrumental)."

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Neuroeducation

Neuroeducation

Neuroscientists explore the biology behind processes such as the formation of memories, creative processes, etc.

Neuroeducation is a recent discipline that draws together ...

The main applications of neuroeducation

  • Attention. To learn, we need to be able to focus on some aspects while ignoring or excluding others. For example, reading this paragraph while ignoring the noise around you.
  • Memory. Knowing how memory works and how you can make learning more efficient can increase your performance. Science-based techniques include interleaving and chunking.
  • Executive control. Being able to plan, to create a sequence of steps, and to retain important information for short periods. While most happens in the prefrontal cortex, lots of research is needed to understand how executive control works.
  • Social behaviour. Social Neuroscience is aiming to understand how our biology affects our social behaviours.
  • Neurodiversity. Conditions such as ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), dyscalculia (difficulty with arithmetical calculations), and dyslexia impact learning. Neuroeducation aims to understand how these conditions best adapt to the learning environment.

Learning: In the classroom and beyond

Learning starts in childhood and continues into adulthood. Some learning happens in our spare time, and a lot in the workplace.

Many of the current applications of neuroeducation in the classroom are usable in the workplace. Since $80 billion is spent every year on corporate training in the United States, we need to ensure training interventions are effective. Neuroeducation could provide an answer, ensuring employees understand how the brain thinks, learn, and make decisions.