Compulsion vs. Habit

  • Habits are repeated actions that must be consciously initiated. Eventually, the process becomes subconscious and automatic: for example, when you are brushing your teeth.
  • Unhealthy habits can become a compulsion or even an addiction. For example, the good habit of regular exercising can become an unhealthy compulsion or addiction when done in excess.

The difference between a compulsive behaviour and a habit is the ability to choose to do them.

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A compulsion is an overwhelming desire to do something. An addiction is a physical or chemical dependence on a substance or behaviour.

Two key differences between compulsion and addiction:

  • Pleasure. Compulsive behaviours rarely result in feelings of pleasure. People with addictions desire the substance or behaviour because they expect to enjoy it.
  • Awareness: People with compulsive disorders are typically aware of their behaviours and bothered by the lack of logical reason for doing them. People with addictions are unaware of or unconcerned about the negative consequences of their actions.
  • Compulsive overeating is the inability to control one's amount of nutritional intake, resulting in weight gain.
  • Compulsive shopping is done to the extent that it impairs the shoppers' lives, leaving them financially unstable.
  • Compulsive checking describes the constant checking of things like locks, switches, and appliances.
  • Hoarding is the excessive saving of items and the inability to throw away any of those items.
  • Compulsive gambling is the inability to stop. It results in serious personal, financial, and social problems.
A compulsive behavior

It involves actions a person feels driven to do over and over again.

Compulsive actions may appear to be irrational or pointless, but the individuals may feel incapable of stopping themselves.

When an otherwise harmless behaviour becomes so consuming that it negatively impacts oneself or others, it may be a symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Most compulsive behaviours attributed to OCD are incredibly time-consuming, cause major distress, and impair work, relationships, or other essential functions. It can include behaviours such as eating, shopping, hoarding and animal hoarding, skin picking, and gambling.

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RELATED IDEAS

  • Compulsive shoppers: Buying when they are feeling emotional distress.
  • Trophy shoppers: They are always looking for the next great item.
  • Flashy shoppers: They desire the attention that comes with having nice, new things.
  • Bargain shoppers: They purchase things through sale, even if they don't need or desire it.
  • Bulimic shoppers: They continually buy and return items.
  • Collective shoppers: They find emotional value and wholeness in having a complete set of things.

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OCD:Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

What is OCD?

These are upsetting thoughts or impulses that repeatedly occur.

  • People with OCD may try to ignore or suppress them, but they may be afraid that somehow the thoughts might be true.
  • The anxiety associated with suppression can also become too great to endure, making them engage in compulsive behaviors to decrease their anxiety.
  • These are repetitive acts that temporarily relieve the stress and anxiety brought on by an obsession. Often, people who have compulsions believe these rituals will prevent something bad from happening.

Apart from mental issues, hoarding increases the chances of:

  1. Risk of falls or tripping.
  2. Infestation.
  3. Unsafe living conditions.
  4. Fire.
  5. Lost work days.

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