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How to make time for exercise - even on your craziest days

Make time for exercise

  • Pick a regular (sedentary) part of your routine and switch it out for an active choice: Instead of the elevator, take the stairs;
  • Commit to movement after the most frustrating, stressful part of your week:  after a weekly meeting or work task;
  • Work out while you watch TV: you get to indulge the part of your brain that's telling you to lie down on the couch while actually circumnavigating laziness.

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How to make time for exercise - even on your craziest days

How to make time for exercise - even on your craziest days

https://bigthink.com/personal-growth/how-to-make-time-for-exercise-even-on-your-craziest-days

bigthink.com

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Key Idea

Make time for exercise

  • Pick a regular (sedentary) part of your routine and switch it out for an active choice: Instead of the elevator, take the stairs;
  • Commit to movement after the most frustrating, stressful part of your week:  after a weekly meeting or work task;
  • Work out while you watch TV: you get to indulge the part of your brain that's telling you to lie down on the couch while actually circumnavigating laziness.

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Excessive sitting

Sitting for an extended period is linked with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and an increased risk of death from heart disease and cancer.

Excessive sitting may also slow metabolism, whi...

Just 30 minutes of activity...
... on 5 days each week (going to the gym, cycling to work, or going for a lunchtime walk) could prevent 1 in 12 deaths globally.

Injecting physical activity into your working day could reduce some of the health risks that are elevated by being sedentary.

Cycle or walk to work
  • Cycling to work has been linked with a reduced risk of death from all causes, and a lower cancer risk.
  • Both cycling and walking to work have also been associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • People who walk or cycle to work have a lower body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage in midlife than those who commute by car.
  • Those who actively commute to work also benefit from improved well-being and report feeling more able to concentrate and under less strain.

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Cardio exercise

Exercise offers a whole host of benefits to health and well-being. Cardiovascular exercises aim to get your heart rate up and increase blood circulation.

Walking is a great way to get active...

Strength & resistance exercises

Resistance and strength exercises can help strengthen your muscles. This is usually done on the spot and will not make you out of breath like cardio exercises.

Instead of using tools like weights or resistance bands, you can use tins of baked beans or bags of rice.

Flexibility, balance, and mobility

Strength and flexibility routines help balance, will reduce joint pain, and reduce the risk of falls.

Yoga, pilates, and tai chi are examples of flexibility exercises.

Building habits

Our habits have the power to enable us, most of the time, to live a more organized life. However, we might find it quite challenging when it comes to establishing new habits, as they require...

Set measurable targets as habits

When trying to build new habits, be specific by thinking about ways to measure the evolution of your action: set clear targets that can help you, when the deadline previously decided on approaches, to evaluate your progress.

The pros and cons of building new habits

When picking up a new habit, think it well through: take into account the possible inconveniences as well as the most attractive advantages. 

Remember that sometimes it might get harder to keep to the habit, but eventually, you are doing it for a good cause that is related directly to yourself.

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