A company's culture: scour the internet for evidence - Deepstash

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How to Find Out if a Company’s Culture is Right for You

A company's culture: scour the internet for evidence

A company's culture can be found online. Companies will have a mission, vision, and culture statement available online. Job seekers should pay attention to the nuances of language.

  • Pay attention to how postings are written. The wording can reveal beliefs and priorities. For example, perks like happy hours may indicate a lack of work-life balance.
  • Use a gender bias decoder. Job descriptions that focus on words like competitive, dominant, or leader may lower female candidates' responses.
  • Check out job review boards like Glassdoor. Reading anonymous reviews from current and former employees will give you insight.
  • Do some digging on social media. Scroll back to times of controversy or uncertainty to see how they reacted to social movements, civil unrest, racism, or public health matters.

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