Writing Conclusion Better: Making It Human

A personal touch is a nice trick to create an impactful conclusion.

The readers will identify and would feel a connection with the personal story humanizing the subject at hand.

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Problem Solving

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The Problem Of Writing A Conclusion

Many authors, article writers and content writers draft samples without a proper conclusion or a wrap-up.

Beginner writers can try to follow the advice on structuring an essay or thesis statement, given by English teachers: “Tell ’em what you’re gonna tell ’em, tell ’em, and then tell ’em what you told ’em.”

Other than that, complex ideas are sometimes difficult to summarize, and there is conflicting advice available, which can be confusing.

Once an author has stated the idea and offered evidence and anecdotes to support it, the concluding part has to answer the ‘so what?’ question that can crop in the reader’s mind, usually when the end of the article/paper is near.

The reader is satisfied once the main take away is clear, and the questions “Why is this important?” Or “Why should anyone care?” are adequately answered.

If something resonates or lingers in the reader's mind, long after the article has been read, then it is a sign that the conclusion was impactful and created an impression.

Asking a direct question or creating a personal challenge makes them think about that idea, and apply it to their lives.

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RELATED IDEAS

Jumping into Conclusions
Jumping to conclusions is a common phenomenon, where people prematurely decide and finalize something, without having sufficient information or choosing not to consider it.

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Readers understand and remember material far better when it is expressed in concrete language that allows them to form visual images. So trying to make the reader “see” is a good goal and being concrete has huge effects.

Write the first draft of your story  in as short a time as possible. If you’re writing a short story, try to write it in one sitting. If you’re writing a novel, try to write it in one season (three months).

Don’t worry too much about plotting or outlining beforehand. You can do that once you know you have a story to tell in the first place. Your first draft is a discovery process. You are like an archeologist digging an ancient city out of the clay. You might have a few clues about where your city is buried beforehand, but you don’t know what it will look like until it’s unearthed.

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