Exercise, but get the timing right - Deepstash

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Exercise, but get the timing right

Exercise, but get the timing right

When you want to learn something in particular, then physical effort does seem to help, at least in the short-term. 

In an experiment, people that did 35 minutes of interval training 4 hours after learning a list of pictures paired with locations were better at remembering the pairs than those who did the interval training straight away.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

When we draw something we are forced to consider in more detail and it’s this deeper processing that makes us more likely to remember it.

Even writing a list helps somehow, which is why when you get to the shop and realise you’ve left your shopping list at home, you can still remember ...

For healthy people, a short break immediately after learning something makes a difference to how much they could remember a whole week later the learning took place.

New memories are fragile, so even a short break can make a difference to whether they hang around or disappear....

Backwards walking (whether real, imaginary, or virtual) can boost your short-term memory. 

To go back in time, it might help to go backwards in space. Moving backwards through space appears to carry the our minds backward along that subjective timeline toward the point at which the r...

Sleep is thought to help consolidate our memories by replaying or reactivating the information we’ve just learned.

That sleep doesn’t have to happen at night. Naps work too, bur mostly for people who are accustomed to regularly taking a nap in the afternoon. 

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Early memories are not reliable

Scientists believe that it is impossible to recall the first few years of life. Many of the necessary brain structures for memory have not yet matured at the time. It means that it is physiologically impossible for your brain to remember personal events from infancy.

Any recollections are ...

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  1. Encoding - the stage when the brain consciously acknowledges information based on our senses. When we attach meaning or factual knowledge to any of this sensory input, that's called semantic encoding which makes us retain memories longer.
  2. Storage - it is when inf...

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