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Which Of These 4 Presentation Styles Do You Have?

The Data Scientist presentation style

The Data Scientist uses data, analytics, facts, and figures to make his point and persuade the audience. 

Pros: This presentation style delivers data, information and analysis and will almost never be filled with fluff.

Cons: an audience that doesn’t want analytics and searches emotional connection will lose interest quickly.

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Which Of These 4 Presentation Styles Do You Have?

Which Of These 4 Presentation Styles Do You Have?

https://www.forbes.com/sites/markmurphy/2016/01/26/which-of-these-4-presentation-styles-do-you-have/#

forbes.com

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Key Ideas

The Data Scientist presentation style

The Data Scientist uses data, analytics, facts, and figures to make his point and persuade the audience. 

Pros: This presentation style delivers data, information and analysis and will almost never be filled with fluff.

Cons: an audience that doesn’t want analytics and searches emotional connection will lose interest quickly.

The Storyteller presentation style

The Storyteller can tap emotions and weave a persuasive narrative.

An audience may not remember every single data point or statistic, but they will remember a great story or emotional connection.

Pros: Focused on making an emotional connection with the audience.

Cons: Not suitable for audiences that just want a factual answer to a simple question.

The Closer presentation style

The Closer jumps into a presentation, cuts right to the chase, delivers the bottom line and skips all the boring stuff.

It sees the end goal and goes right for it. 

Pros: reduces a presentation to its esssence.

Cons: may be perceived as too harsh or abrupt.

The Director presentation style

The Director likes presentations to have a clear linear flow, with logically structured slide decks and clear transitions across topics and presenters. 

Pros: delivers ordered, logical and structurally sound presentations.

Cons: may not work if the presentation you’ve so carefully prepared is a poor fit for your audience.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Bill Gates presentation style
  • Catching attention with an interesting statement, to build connection with your audience
  • Using gestures
  • Showing investment in the subject
Cite examples
When you speak about an idea or process to your audience, you know exactly what you're talking about. But the audience doesn't. 

These concepts can be very abstract without concrete examples to illustrate. Give them examples, and you'll keep their attention.

Ask effective questions
When you make a statement to your audience, they're passive. Asking questions gets them involved mentally, making them active.


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A TED Talk is 18 minutes long
A TED Talk is 18 minutes long

TED curator Chris Anderson explains:
The 18-minute length works much like the way Twitter forces people to be disciplined in what they write. By forcing speakers who are u...

Give a TED-style talk that gets a lot of views
  • Arrange your message onto the 9-up format: same size as sticky notes, until you are happy with the flow.
  • Solicit feedback from effective presenters that you trust to give honest, unfiltered feedback on your narrative and slides.
  • Rehearse with a great (honest) communicator that is not afraid to speak up.
  • Articulate each point clearly.
  • Practice with a clock counting up the minutes, to know how much you're over. Then trim it down.
  • Once you're within the timeframe, practice with a clock counting down. Know where you should be at 6, 12 and 18 minutes.
  • Let your coach jot down what you say well and what you don’t.
  • Don’t be camera shy. Practice by videotaping yourself.
  • Do one more full timed rehearsal right before you walk on stage.
  • Pick two natural places you could stop in your talk, then demarcate those as possible endings.
The TED-Style Talk
The TED-Style Talk
  • This type of talk is scripted and carefully rehearsed, then delivered without notes, from memory.
  • It is professionally visualized. The slides, vid...
The TED Talks Approach
  • TED-style talks are personal. Your passion and sense of purpose create an energy boost for both you and your audience.
  • TED talks often take us on a journey. Where business speeches generally focus on a desired outcome, TED talks are also about the process of realizing how you’re going to get there.
  • TED talks are concise. Every word of a TED talk counts.
  • TED-style talks present an “aha!” moment.
Craft Your TED-Style Talk
  • Choose a topic you’re personally passionate about
  • Play with different ways to narrate your journey of discovery around that topic
  • Stay focused on your most important point
  • Understand what makes all of this important to your audience.
You don’t care enough about the audience

Most people think they are the most important player in a presentation. They are wrong. The audience, the listeners, the people watching the presenter are the most important players.

The Words and the Design

The work on the presentation slides should be clear, crisp, concise, with fewer words and more visually striking simple imagery.

Long sentences and tiny words going through the whole slide are not advisable.

Lack of Practice

Invest your time practicing thoughtfully and getting in a zone where you are a natural.

An effortless-looking presentation makes the audience love it, even though you have toiled hard to make it look effortless.

Adapting to context

Different types of information demand different styles of note-taking. There are lots of reasons to take notes: to retain information, to capture ideas, to problem solve or brainstorm, to visualize...

The Outline/List

Is a linear method of taking notes that proceeds down the page, using indentation or bullets to denote major and minor points.

Pros: it records content relationship in a way that is easy to review.

Cons: difficult to go back and edit information written in this system.

Works for: recording terms, definitions, facts and sequences, when taking notes on slides or readings.

The Sentence Method

The goal is to jot down your thoughts as quickly as possible. Format is kept to a minimum: every new thought is written on a new line. 

Pros: Is like free writing for notes.

Cons: lack organization and notes can be hard to understand.

Works for: meetings or lectures that lack organization; when information is presented very quickly.

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69% of managers

...say they’re uncomfortable communicating with employees. 

And that number is significantly higher when the roles are reversed.

Analytical communication style

An analytical communicator loves hard data, numbers, and specific language. 

They're usually wary of people who deal in vague language and strictly blue-sky ideas and get drained quickly when conversations move from logical to emotional.

Working with an analytical communication style

Dos:

  • Provide as much detail upfront as possible
  • Set clear expectations
  • Give them space to work independently

Don'ts:

  • Turning the conversation emotional;
  • Framing feedback on their work as criticism.

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Dramatic strategy ...
Dramatic strategy ...
  • ... moves audiences, 
  • empowers them to play a role and 
  • realigns them with a higher purpose.

The method was flawlessly employed by St...

Dramaturgical model of communication

Focus on communicating meaning by enabling followers to become emotionally invested in change by being part of the larger narrative.

This communication approach spurs its constituency through imagination towards a common goal. 

Considerations for dramaturgical approach
  • Leaders should "manufacture" meaning.
  • Narratives are enhanced when storytellers bring the audience into the present

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Observe, Accept, and Reframe

Recognizing and accepting the fact you're being nervous before an important presentation will help you more than trying to fight those anxious feelings. Resistance creates even more angst.

On...

Focus on Your Body

Instead of being swept in the spiral of negative thoughts like 'What if I fail? What will they think of me? try to be aware of your physical sensations: how your heart beats, how the air fills your lungs, the heat and sweat you feel.

This will anchor you in the present moment and calm your nerves.

Tips For Calming Your Nerves
  • Make sure you get a good night’s sleep, that you're hydrated and that you had a good meal before. 
  • Be careful with your caffeine intake before a big presentation so that your heart rate isn’t already elevated.
  • Strike a power pose. Research shows it can shift your mood and make you feel more confident. 
  • Own the space. If you can, get to the room early and really imagine owning it.

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There are 4 strong personalities...

...that stand out for their ability, both positively and negatively, to impact team dynamics, especially when it comes to meetings: the Challengers, the Analyzers, the Implementers and th...

The Challengers

The big idea people, who love going against convention. They are the people that blurt out mid meeting "This is a stupid idea. I've got something better we can try instead."

They can deliver the great idea that unsticks a team's thinking, but when the team has been developing that other idea for a long time, and some team members are deeply invested in the work that's already been done,  the team dynamics can quickly sour.

The Analyzers

The content experts, analyzers don't know everything, but what they do know, they know extremely well.

When a team is dealing with a challenge that matches the Analyzer's area of expertise, you're on the path to solve the problem. But when the team focus strays from the Analyzer's areas of expertise, they get bored, lose interest, often affecting a dismissive attitude that can drag down other team members.

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Work styles
Work styles

Work styles refer to the way we think, structure, organize, and complete our work

They the foundation upon which businesses operate and grow today.

4 types of work styles

In any organization you will usually find these main work styles:

  • Logical, analytical, linear, and data-oriented
  • Organized, sequential, planned, and detailed-oriented
  • Supportive, expressive, and emotionally oriented
  • Big-picture, integrative, and ideation-oriented.
The data-oriented colleague

Their strengths are in analyzing data, logical processing, and solving complex problems.

They are focused on achieving the established goals and will ensure that you stay on budget.

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