Anxiety and excessive thinking

Anxiety is mostly triggered internally by excessive thoughts (for example, judgments about the past or worries about the future).

Like stress, anxiety can be useful in the right scenarios. The discomfort it makes us feel was designed to alert us of something, precisely so that we listen up and protect ourselves.

Elaina Y. (@elaina_y61) - Profile Photo

@elaina_y61

🍎

Health

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Stress and anxiety: related, but not synonymous states

We often use the words “anxiety” and “stress” interchangeably. Both are normal, adaptive responses to life’s challenges and share many symptoms ( for example, worry, stomach aches, restlessness, muscle tension, racing thoughts, headaches, sleepless nights, etc.)

But despite their similarities, there are important differences between the two. And knowing the differences is the first step towards finding relief.

  • It is designed to make it easier for us to fight or flee from life-threatening triggers.
  • Stress is usually defined as a response to an external trigger, and can either be acute (a tight deadline) or chronic (persistent financial trouble).
  • While stress might not feel good in the moment, it can still be helpful by motivating us to stay alert and take action when we need to.

When left unchecked, both stress and anxiety can escalate into more severe mental health conditions.

  • Anxiety disorder, which includes generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is the most common mental health condition in the U.S., affecting more than 40 million Americans.
  • Globally, anxiety disorders are also the most common mental health condition, affecting up to one in 13 people.
  • The basic criteria for determining whether stress or anxiety have become problematic is whether they have begun adversely affecting key domains of your life.

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

Worry

Worry is the cognitive part of anxiety, with it's repetitive and obsessive thought patterns in our mind. Worry is sometimes essential for us to solve problems or take action, provided we are not stuck in a constant state of worry.

Ways to Handle Worry:

  • Allot some time a day, say 15 to 20 minutes, to worry about problems.
  • Be aware of your worrying, and push yourself into action.
  • Write your worries down, as it can calm obsessive thoughts.

3

IDEAS

Stressed Take Vitamins to Combat
  • Stress can be acute or chronic, lead to fatigue, headaches, upset stomach, nervousness and irritability or anger.
  • Regular exercise, adequate sleep, and good nutrition are some of the best ways to better equip your body to combat stress, but several Vitamins and supplements can also help.
Fear as a defense mechanism

Fear protects organisms against a perceived threat to their integrity or existence. Fear can be as simple as moving away from a negative stimulus, or as complex as existential anxiety in a human.

Some of the brain's main chemicals that contribute to the "fight or flight" response are also involved in other emotional states such as happiness and excitement. It makes sense that the high arousal state we experience during a scare may also be seen in a more positive light.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTopicsTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap