Organizational change management (OCM) - Deepstash

Organizational change management (OCM)

It refers to any event or program an enterprise undertakes that causes major disruption to daily operations.

Organizational change management ensures that the new processes resulting from a project are actually adopted by the people who are affected.

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  • It takes a great deal of time to change attitudes and behaviors.
  • Change management is not deterministic. Unlike computer programs, people can be unpredictable and illogical.
  • Change management is a contact sport. The CM team needs to interact one on one with individuals who will need to change.
  • Cultural differences can make CM difficult
  • Change management can be started too early.

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  • The right executive sponsor: responsible for developing the case for change and obtaining the necessary OCM resources.
  • Cultural willingness to adapt and change:  all organizations resist change to some degree.
  • Individual willingness to change: individuals must be willing to examine new information and adopt new behaviors and approaches.
  • Rewards and consequences: major changes need to be reinforced by rewards and consequences.

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Benefits of change management

Change management reduces the risk that a new system or other change will be rejected by the enterprise.

By itself, it does not reduce costs or increase sales. Instead, it increases the teamwork required for the enterprise accept the change and operate more efficiently.

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Leo Tolstoy

“Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”

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Continuous improvement

Is an ongoing effort to improve all elements of an organization - processes, tools, products, services, etc. 

It rests on the belief that a steady stream of improvements, diligently executed, will have transformational results.

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Changing is necessary and takes energy but our brains tend to try to conserve energy as much as possible. So we have mental biases that influence our behaviors and make us shy away from opportunities—even when they benefit us in the long-term.

Two of the main bias are loss aversion and failure bias. The former is our tendency to keep what we have rather than gain something equivalent, and the latter is our tendency to assume failure is a more likely outcome than success, and, as a result, treat successful outcomes as flukes and bad results as confirmation of it.

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