Uncovering your real career related wants. - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

How to Pick a Career (That Actually Fits You) - Wait But Why

Uncovering your real career related wants.

  • Play the Why Game: Why is this something I want? 
  • Look at your Denial Prison: Uncovering your authentic wants that are repressed.
  • Priority Rankings: Almost as important as the wants themselves is the priority they’re given.

236 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Pick a Career (That Actually Fits You) - Wait But Why

How to Pick a Career (That Actually Fits You) - Wait But Why

https://waitbutwhy.com/2018/04/picking-career.html

waitbutwhy.com

9

Key Ideas

The Real Career Landscape

If you can figure out how to get a reasonably accurate picture of the real career landscape out there, you have a massive edge over everyone else, most of whom will be using outdated conventional wisdom as their instruction booklet.

The career pitfall

Careers used to be kind of like a 40-year tunnel. You picked your tunnel, and once you were in, that was that. You worked in that profession for 40 years or so before the tunnel spit you out on the other side into your retirement.

Today’s career landscape isn’t a lineup of tunnels, it’s a massive, impossibly complex, rapidly changing science laboratory. 

Why Career-path-carving is important.

Time. A typical career will take up somewhere between 20% and 60% of your meaningful adult time.

Quality of Life. Your career has a major effect on all your non-career hours.

Impact. Whatever shape your career path ends up taking, the world will be altered by it.

Identity. We tell people about our careers by telling them what we are.

The simple career framework

  1. List careers you want/find desirable.
  2. List all careers that are realistic to potentially achieve.
  3. Find the overlapping areas between what is desirable, and what is possible.

5 Conflicting Yearnings that influence the Careers you want.

  1. Personal. The human need for fulfilment.
  2. Social. Diverse social desires that want to be relevant, important, widely known, accepted, well-liked and agreeable.
  3. Lifestyle. The desire to have a stress-free life.
  4. Moral. The desire to do something philanthropic, or to display altruistic behaviour.
  5. Practical. The desire to look after your practical needs, like food, clothing, housing.

Uncovering your real career related wants.

  • Play the Why Game: Why is this something I want? 
  • Look at your Denial Prison: Uncovering your authentic wants that are repressed.
  • Priority Rankings: Almost as important as the wants themselves is the priority they’re given.

The Career Landscape

Broad landscape.

The landscape today is made up of thousands of options and the way things work today, if there’s an option you want that’s not already out there, you can probably create it for yourself.

Specific Career Path.

A career path is like a game board. The conventional wisdom bookshelf contains instruction booklets for only a small fraction of today’s available game boards—and those that it does have usually tell you how that game was played in the past, even though the current game board has evolved significantly into something with new kinds of opportunities and different rules and loopholes.

Understanding Your Potential

When assessing your chances on a certain career path, the key question is:

With enough time, could you get good enough at this game to potentially reach whatever your definition of success is in that career?

Plot your Career Path

After considering

  • The general landscape 
  • Specific careers
  • Where your Starting point is (based on your current skills, resources, and connections relevant to that field)
  • Your Success point/End point
  • Your estimate of your pace of improvement
  • Your level of persistence 

you are able to plot your career path forward.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

A Changing Work Culture

The work culture is changing globally. On one side we have large, established companies which are the gravest offenders. They have deeply entrenched hierarchies, rules, regulations, and ...

Disrupt

Companies are recognizing that the old way may amplify the employee's resentment to the conformance and the 'fitting in', and that they must upgrade their culture.

New Choices in the Old Way
  • The traditional career path now offers new kinds of digital opportunities as new technologies offer new possibilities and are also streamlining the old operation process.

  • As Big Tech expands further, new innovations will transform many current jobs.
  • It is a good idea to keep looking, keep learning, and be ready to pivot.

3 more ideas

Changing careers
You and you alone are responsible for creating your own future. 

Time to give serious thought to this life-shaping question: What exactly are you going to do with the rest of your li...

Start with honest self-assessment
  • Analyze your current skill set, training level, and accomplishments to date. 
  • Write down the aspects of the work you liked and what tasks or things you disliked
  • Explore different career options. Investigate new fields, industries and potential careers. 
  • Interview individuals who work at those types of jobs, or in fields of interest to you. 
  • Look at growth opportunities, salaries, benefits, education level and then determine the job title to target.
Change from careers
  • Use your transferable skills. You have acquired abilities from previous positions.
  • Use your strengths. Incorporate your talents into any position you choose to go after.
  • Get new skills. Study the industry you want to enter. Take some courses so you can more quickly enter the field.
  • Many people prevent their own success. They find excuses, or blame others, for their own failures or mistakes instead of learning and improving from them.

one more idea

How to tell if you’re in the wrong career

Ask yourself these three questions:

  • Is your paycheck the only thing fueling your workday?
  • Are you a chronic complainer?
  • D...
How to change careers
  • Do an assessment. Make a list of your strengths, weaknesses, what you like and hate to do. Look outside and ask what industry lines up with the things you wrote under strengths and likes.
  • Avoid dwelling on the past. Take what you’ve learned and move it to an industry that’s going to suit you better.
  • Jumping ship isn’t always the answer. Walking away from an unfulfilling career isn’t always an option, especially for those who can’t afford the financial consequences of making a switch.
  • Don’t react too quickly. Know the kind of person you are and the kind of job you would enjoy before you can look out at the universe of jobs that are out there and make the move.
Purpose of Career Networking

It involves using personal, professional, academic or familial contacts to assist with a job search, achieve career goals, or learn more about your field, or another field you'd like to work in....

Top 7 Networking Tips
  1. Include the right people: anyone who can assist you with a career move
  2. Know what your career network can do for you
  3. Keep in touch - work your network: People are more willing to help when they know who you are
  4. Give to get - what can you do for your career network
  5. Keep track of your network

    make sure you know who is who, where they work, and how to get in touch.

  6. Network online
  7. Attend networking events.
To switch careers effectively
... and achieve a positive outcome, you need 4 things: clarity, courage, confidence, and competence.

Without these, you’ll most likely struggle hard and fail.  

“The Pendulum Effect”

Don't run from your career because you've broken down in it. Running away will not solve your problems – they’ll just be repeated in the next career.

Make your situation better by repairing broken relationships, finding your voice, growing out skills, and becoming more competent. Then, when you do leave, you’ll be able to achieve the next level of success.

Develop a financial plan

... that will support your transition.

Do solid research and explore your desired change with your accountant and financial consultant and experts in that career, to understand clearly, without emotion, the financial requirements necessary to support you through what can be years of transition. If there’s no money available, wait until you can access some.

3 more ideas

Leverage Your Competitive Advantage

Career plans should leverage your assets, set you in direction of your aspirations, and account for the market realities.

  • Articulate educated hypotheses about each...
Prioritize Learning

A person with a foundation of knowledge and skills will make more money and most likely live a more meaningful life.
There’s a similar belief in start-ups: technology companies focus on learning over profitability in the early years to maximize revenue in the later years.

Prioritize plans that offer the best chance at learning about yourself and the world. Ask yourself, “Which plan offers the most learning potential?”

Learn by Doing

Any entrepreneur (and any expert on cognition / learning) will tell you that practical knowledge is best developed by doing, not just thinking or planning.

For careers, too, you don’t know what the best plan is until you try. 

2 more ideas

Feeling stuck in your career

A lot of people complain that they feel stuck in their careers: they feel they're working hard, but they don't seem to move forward in life.

This feeling of being stuck has to do with a ...

Knowledge and Meta-Knowledge

Doing well in your career requires there factors:

  • Being capable of doing your work well. This requires knowledgeFor example, if you’re a lawyer, you need to have a rich knowledge of the law.
  • Meta-knowledge, or knowledge about how your career works. For example, knowing which skills matter and how to best demonstrate your talent in your particular industry.
How to get Meta-Knowledge

The main route to meta-knowledge is by doing research. And it involves studying people, more than books or in a particular school.

But avoid simply asking people for advice. When you ask for advice, you’ll often get vague, unhelpful answers. Instead, you need to observe what the people that are successful in your field are doing.

Your Future Career Remuneration

Look at the bottom end of the average salaries of the career you are interested in and ask yourself whether you'd be able to survive on that if you got one of those jobs.

Similarly, lo...

Brush Up Your Skills
  • Research What's In Demand. Your first stop should be the boards and company websites that post the jobs you're interested in.
  • Beef Up Your Resume. Don't neglect the experience you already bring to the table. Soft skills you may have learned (management skills, organizational skills, etc) may be a huge benefit, so don't write them off completely. 
  • Go Back to School to pick up those new languages, skills, and techniques required to be competitive in your chosen field. 
  • Build Your Network. Get acquainted not just with the people you want to emulate, but other people who are doing what you do now.
Get Some Experience
  • Use Your Skills for Personal or Pet Projects.
  • Intern or Volunteer.
  • Freelance or Start a Side Gig.

one more idea

Creating your career

Most people never make a conscious decision about their careers and end up at a certain place, due to external factors and present opportunities. Their career path wasn't carved out or planned.

...
You Decide who you become

Here are Five Steps that can create your career:

1. Analyzing yourself.

2. Identify your industry

3. Improve your basic, universal skills

4. Start from Scratch

5. Continuous Self-Development

Self-analysis

When you analyze yourself, instead of pondering over what you are not good at, find out your strengths and sharpen them, turning a good skill into excellence.

4 more ideas

Traditional career paths

They are now fading, giving way to portfolio careers, hybrid roles, gigs, and virtual arrangements.

This is causing frustration for job seekers who are pursuing unconventional job changes, wh...

Start before you’re ready

In this ever-changing marketplace, chances are you’ll never feel 100% prepared. 

If your next step is unclear, the best way to find clarity is to move forward. Your view of the situation and potential solutions will be clearer when you're in the middle of it rather than when you’re on the outside looking in.

Follow your fear

Pay attention to those activities that feel scary - they're usually your next stretch goal waiting to be tackled.

You might make mistakes, but your other option is to do nothing and remain stagnant.

4 more ideas