The Existence of Round Planets - Deepstash
The Existence of Round Planets

The Existence of Round Planets

The life cycle of a planet usually begins when the gravity of the star attracts clouds of rocks and dust until it forms into a blob that attracts more matter towards its center.

Since gravity works in all directions equally, this is the reason why planets are round-shaped instead of any other form.

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The Shape of Moons and Asteroid

The idea of a cube-shaped moon is not entirely impossible. However, for it to happen, it will take a much longer time before we are able to see one.

Asteroids and moons are generally smaller than planets therefore it goes to show that they both have lesser gravity thus they are less round than planets.

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Imperfectly Perfect-Sphered Planets

Although the roundness of the planets is not perfect, every planet belongs in its own spherical category, like the Earth is an "oblate spheroid."

Due to the differences in the planet's sizes, bigger planets such as Saturn may gather extra mass around its middle area and get thicker.

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RELATED IDEA

Why do things stay in orbit?

An object in motion will stay in motion unless something pushes or pulls on it

This statement is called Newton's first law of motion

Without gravity, an Earth-orbiting satellite would go off into space along a straight line. With gravity, it is pulled back toward Earth.

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Jupiter

Jupiter is our fith planet from our Sun and is by far, the largest planet in the solar system - more than twice as massive as all the other planets combined. Jupiter's stripes and swirls are actually cold, windy clouds of ammonia and water, floating in an atmosphere of hydrogen and helium. Jupiter’s iconic Great Red Spot is a giant storm bigger than Earth that has raged for hundreds of years.

Jupiter is surrounded by dozens of moons. Jupiter also has several rings, but unlike the famous rings of Saturn, Jupiter’s rings are very faint and made of dust, not ice.

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Uranus

The seventh planet from the Sun with the third largest diameter in our solar system, Uranus is very cold and windy. The ice giant is surrounded by 13 faint rings and 27 small moons as it rotates at a nearly 90-degree angle from the plane of its orbit. This unique tilt makes Uranus appear to spin on its side, orbiting the Sun like a rolling ball.

The first planet found with the aid of a telescope, Uranus was discovered in 1781 by astronomer William Herschel, although he originally thought it was either a comet or a star. It was two years later that the object was universally accepted as a new planet, in part because of observations by astronomer Johann Elert Bode.

William Herschel tried unsuccessfully to name his discovery Georgium Sidus after King George III. Instead the planet was named for Uranus, the Greek god of the sky, as suggested by Johann Bode.

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