Defined roles - Deepstash

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3 Ingredients for Building Effective Teams

Defined roles

Roles might shift somewhat once the team is assembled, but an understanding of the skill sets and thinking styles is important for the team.

For example, the explorer will be more of a big-picture thinker who can help the team see what is possible and the number-cruncher will take charge of measurement and metrics, etc. 

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Intrapreneurship

An intrapreneur can be defined as someone who thinks like an entrepreneur but brings their ideas to the company where they are employed instead of launching their own business. 

Instate a "no idea is a bad idea" policy, gather the support your employees need to try out their ideas and let them pitch decision-makers at your company.

McKnight’s 15-percent-time rule

This allows employees to spend 15 % of their paid work time daydreaming, doodling or experimenting with ideas that don’t necessarily have to do with their work at the company.

This kind of daydreaming is the genesis of invention and fosters passion for one’s work.

Identifying problems

Optimists tend to avoid difficult conversations and this could lead them to miss the opportunity of addressing critical issues. 

Pessimists inherently look for the problems more than ...

Hearing only agreement

Pessimists are good role models for those who are "yes men". 

If you only have around you people that agree with you, you are being set up for failure.

Unprepared for the downside

Optimists often fail to have a Plan B because they believe they can control all the elements within Plan A.

Pessimists can alert a team regarding the risks that would require a Plan B.

The concept of servant leadership
The actual term for a leader who upends the power pyramid to put others' needs first was introduced by Robert Greenleaf in his influential 1970 essay "The Servant As Leader" in 1970.
The 6 main principles of servant leadership
  1. Empathy. Give trusted co-workers the benefit of the doubt by assuming the good in them. It goes a long way toward instilling loyalty and trust in you from your team.
  2. Awareness. Care deeply about the welfare of the team members. Don't view them only as cogs in a machine.
  3. Building community. Build community where both employees and customers can thrive.
  4. Persuasion. Rely on persuasion rather than coercion to create internal motivation required to complete the task effectively.
  5. Conceptualization. Servant-leading entrepreneurs focus on the big picture and don't get overly distracted by daily operations and short-term goals.
  6. Growth. Care passionately about the personal and professional growth of each member of the team.