How to vent safely

  • Write it down until you feel some of that tension ease up. It may even help you to think more clearly about the issues you're facing.
  • Take a walk. A brief stroll can help distract you. It can also lower your blood pressure and boost your mood. You can also share your troubles with a confidante in a way that doesn't compromise the work environment.
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  • Keep the chat safe. Wanting to ping your work friend about how much you dislike your job can cause you harm. Pinging a group chat by accident or DMing the wrong person could have serious implications. A good rule of thumb: Never say something on chat or email you wouldn't want your team to hear.
  • Choose wisely who you should vent to. It is better to chat with someone you trust than with a new intern who may not know what to do with the information.
Venting is not the same as complaining
  • Complaining is characterised by whining about the same issues while blaming external factors for your emotions. It tends to be chronic.
  • Venting is a momentary release of emotion and frustration. After blowing off some steam, you can continue with your day in a relatively normal manner.

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RELATED IDEAS

Venting feelings is not always helpful

Science suggests that while venting your emotions feel good in the moment, it might make matters worse in the long run.

Sharing our emotions reduces our stress and make us feel closer to others. When we open up, and people respond with sympathy, we feel understood and supported. But, expressing our emotions often to others may make us feel worse if we fail to gain some perspective and don't take steps to soothe ourselves.

Does Venting Your Feelings Actually Help?

greatergood.berkeley.edu

The signs of burnout
  • You dread going to work in the morning.
  • You show up late or find reasons to leave early.
  • You feel bored or don’t want to engage with the work when you’re there.
  • You’re complaining about work a lot.
  • You check your work email first thing in the morning and before you go to bed.
  • You plan all your vacations, so you are always available in case they suddenly need you.
  • You’re having frequent work dreams and nightmares.

Feeling burned out at work? Here's how you can take back your life.

vox.com

Tough Compassion

The idea of tough compassion has been gaining traction because the pastel-colored version of it is proving to be unhelpful at the moment.

The idea has been described by psychologist Dacher Keltner who said that it is in line with the Buddhist tradition of stepping in to guide the person onto a different form of behavior.

The goal of true compassion is to find ways to promote the least suffering for everyone, and so, there must be the willingness to bear but also the capability to inflict some discomfort in the moment to promote longer-term well-being.

Tough compassion — here’s what it is and why you need to practice it

ideas.ted.com

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