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7 Fundamental Principles From the Book Think and Grow Rich

Fundamental Principles From Think and Grow Rich

Fundamental Principles From Think and Grow Rich
  • Everything which is tangible began as a thought: Anything that you create in your mind and trust that it is possible, you can achieve.
  • Win or quit, pick a side. Winners do not quit and quitters do not win.
  • Our minds receive ideas from the universe. The universe feeds us with ideas constantly.
  • If you have a burning desire for something, you can achieve it.
  • Failures don't mean that you have failed.
  • Have faith - an absolute certainty with no fear, that you will succeed.
  • Implementing your idea is the most important step of achieving your dreams.

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7 Fundamental Principles From the Book Think and Grow Rich

7 Fundamental Principles From the Book Think and Grow Rich

https://greatperformersacademy.com/books/7-fundamental-principles-from-the-book-think-and-grow-rich

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Key Ideas

Think and Grow Rich

... is the most successful personal development book ever written. It was first published in 1937 and has since sold over 70 million copies. 

This tremendously successful book was written by the late Napoleon Hill. He was an American author of the new thought movement.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Thoughts are powerful
Thoughts are powerful

Thinking - the mixture of initiative, faith, willingness to win, and resilience - is more conducive to success than any other feature. 

Desire...

... is the one stage that links thoughts and actions together:

Thoughts → Committment (or Desire) → Action.

Faith

It means convincing yourself that your goal is achievable.

With a specific end in mind, practice convincing your mind of the opportunity to realize that goal, and after a while, your mind will start to subconsciously act on behalf of your belief system.

7 more ideas

Hill was a charlatan

Napoleon Hill was said to be an advisor to two presidents: Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
In fact, there’s no evidence whatsoever outside of Hill’s own writings that Hill ...

Hill and Carnegie

Napoleon Hill’s most infamous claim was that he met and interviewed at length the industrialist Andrew Carnegie in 1908.

Andrew Carnegie's biographer David Nasaw found no evidence of any sort that Carnegie and Hill ever met.

Serial swindler

Napoleon Hill tried his hand at a number of businesses. But at every turn, there was some kind of shady dealing that would cause his business ventures to crumble.

Promoters of Hill claim that it was all a matter of bad luck, and Hill's naivety. However, there are only so many times that a man can be arrested for the sale of unlicensed stock, altering checks, and outright theft, before you have to question the official history.

7 more ideas

Rich Dad, Poor Dad
Rich Dad, Poor Dad

"Rich Dad, Poor Dad" is a best-selling personal finance book, written by Robert T. Kiyosaki and Sharon L. Lechter.

It reads like an allegorical story about Robert Kiyosaki a...

“Poor dad” vs "Rich Dad" Mentality

The “Poor dad”, a stereotype for the regular salary man, believes that one should work for money as an employee at a stable job. This mentality can trap a person into working a job they don’t love, but is willing to stick with because they have to pay the bills.

The "Rich dad", an entrepreneur, thinks wealth comes from experience-based learning (learn on the job, by becoming an entrepreneur) and multiple income streams.

When the “poor dad” encourages working your way up the ladder, “rich dad” laughs and says, “Why not own the ladder?”

Key lessons for becoming a "Rich Dad"

According to Kiyosaki in his book "Poor Dad, Rich Dad", rich people do certain things poor people don't:

  1. The rich buy assets (things that generate revenue like bonds), not liabilities (things that cost money like rent).
  2. The rich become financial literate through experience, not by studying hard at fancy schools.
  3. The rich learn to sell early on.
  4. The rich manage fear better. They take more risks and don't play it safe.