Communication Guidelines At Work

  • Email is best used for clear, unambiguous communication that is important and may be shared with others.
  • If something is super-urgent or requires a lot of explaining, picking up the phone is the way to go.
  • When we require emotion or the issue is complex, a face-to-face meeting is the best bet.
  • For non-critical queries that anyone can answer, a slack message does the job.
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Communication

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We Use Email The Wrong Way

Email is essential in a workplace and yet can suck our productivity in a uniquely annoying way. On an average workday, we check our email 15 times, which leads to wasted time and distractions.

Email isn’t even the best way a person can communicate, as it does not provide the recipient with our intended tone, intentions and purpose in an exact way.

Human nature tends to conform to the majority and leans towards safety in numbers. Adopted practices (like email) become the default even when they are not the best solution because everyone else is on it.

Work is done more effectively with in-person or virtual meetings, while instant messengers are less formal and more intuitive while being easy to check.

Email has real value in communicating the following:

  1. A formal communication decision.
  2. Confirming or scheduling appointments with the help of Calendar.
  3. Documenting important conversations.
  4. Company-wide announcements that are high-impact and need to be communicated to all in real-time.

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RELATED IDEAS

Waiting For The Email Response

A common scenario in the world of remote working is waiting for a response for the email one has sent, looking for the information, input or conversation that is required from a coworker or a client.

While we start to think that we are being ghosted, it is common for people to delay email responses as they are juggling work and personal commitments, and our email does not make it to their top 10 list of must-do work. We can keep a few things in mind while reaching the person again in a follow up email.

How to Follow Up With Someone Who’s Not Getting Back to You

hbr.org

Faster Isn’t Better

Back-to-back video calls, all-day team chats combined with an expectation of immediate response is taking its toll on people trying to work from home.

In the quest to create a real-time interaction of the office, we are cutting the remote workers' ability to get things done.

When it comes to team communication, faster isn’t always better

qz.com

Creating a controllable inbox

Many people decry how awful email is. They feel that messages keep on appearing in their inbox as if they have no control over them.
The first step to a controllable inbox is to slow down the messages.

  • Unsubscribe to all the blogs and newsletters you subscribed to or set up a separate email account for it.
  • Be selective on marketing.
  • Kill all non-essential email notifications.
  • Be a ruthless unsubscriber.

How I’ve Made Email my Secret Weapon

medium.com

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