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4 Reasons Your Constructive Criticism Keeps Going Over So Badly

4 Reasons Giving Constructive Criticism Goes Bad

  1. You’re not offering anything constructive if all you do is point out problems. You can still direct attention to an issue, but make sure that you follow up with a helpful suggestion.
  2. You’re offering unrequested input. Before speaking up, ask yourself if this is something that really even requires your input or if your input is properly qualified for the situation.
  3. You’re starting all wrong if you open with “No offense, but…” “Don’t take this the wrong way, but…” “This might sound really mean, but…” These introductions function as an advanced warning for rude or overly personal words to come.
  4. You’re too aggressive on how you deliver your message. To avoid it, maintain a happy and friendly tone with open body language. Also, choose words that clarify you are making suggestions—not demands, like using “might” or “could” instead of “should”.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

4 Reasons Your Constructive Criticism Keeps Going Over So Badly

4 Reasons Your Constructive Criticism Keeps Going Over So Badly

https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-reasons-your-constructive-criticism-keeps-going-over-so-badly

themuse.com

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Key Idea

4 Reasons Giving Constructive Criticism Goes Bad

  1. You’re not offering anything constructive if all you do is point out problems. You can still direct attention to an issue, but make sure that you follow up with a helpful suggestion.
  2. You’re offering unrequested input. Before speaking up, ask yourself if this is something that really even requires your input or if your input is properly qualified for the situation.
  3. You’re starting all wrong if you open with “No offense, but…” “Don’t take this the wrong way, but…” “This might sound really mean, but…” These introductions function as an advanced warning for rude or overly personal words to come.
  4. You’re too aggressive on how you deliver your message. To avoid it, maintain a happy and friendly tone with open body language. Also, choose words that clarify you are making suggestions—not demands, like using “might” or “could” instead of “should”.

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Let it Go

Interruptions can be frustrating. But, the point here is that not all of them are worthy of addressing.

Sometimes, the best thing you can do when faced with an interruption is nothing at all,...

Set Expectations From The Beginning

Whether you’re speaking up in a team meeting or you’re conducting a presentation, it’s important to be clear that you'll need to get all of your ideas out there before opening the floor to questions and contributions. 

This sets the tone right from the get-go that you’re aiming to share your ideas free of interruptions. This also makes it easy to halt an interrupter in his tracks.

Keep Going

Sometimes you can only fight fire with fire.

Refuse to pause for interruptions, and instead continue moving forward with your ideas. If needed, you can even pause for a second to address the interrupter and say, “one moment,” and then finish off your thought.

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The Right Time And Place

Pull the person you want to correct aside for a private, one-on-one conversation instead of highlighting their error in front of a larger group.
Also, to correct them before they get in trouble ...

Use Clarifying Questions

They will help you to:

  • Gut-check our own correction. Hearing another person's reasoning might get you to realize that you are actually the one who's wrong.
  • It makes you seem more aggressive and the person that did wrong might accept your help to make the necessary corrections.

Back Up Your Point With Evidence

When you’re correcting someone , be prepared to back up your point with real evidence, and not just your well-intended opinion.
Real data that supports your point is the single best way to correct false information.

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“People seldom refuse help, if one offers it in the right way.”

A. C. Benson.

On Giving Constructive Criticism

Sharing and receiving feedback is necessary for improvement. If you have ideas on how someone can improve, don’t hold your ideas back, share your criticism constructively.

Of course, be sensitive to others’ feelings and offer feedback when you feel the other person is ready to take it. Else, you may come across as imposing your views on others, especially if you repeatedly tell them what to do without them requesting it.

1. Use The Feedback Sandwich

Also known as PIP (Positive-Improvement-Positive), it consists of “sandwiching” a critic between two positive comments in the following manner:

  1. Start by focusing on the strengths — what you like about the item in question.
  2. Then, provide the criticism — things you don’t like and areas of improvement.
  3. Lastly, round off the feedback with (a) a reiteration of the positive comments you began with and (b) the positive results that can be expected if the criticism is acted upon.

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