Common decision-making mistakes

  1. Making impromptu decisions. Take the time to think about the pros and cons of your decision and weigh out the consequences.
  2. Lacking peace.  Take deep breaths in a quiet environment to evaluate the facts before you decide.
  3. Wallowing in the chaos of everyday life, or listening to too many other people. 
  4. Not considering priorities. Make a list of your important priorities. It will help you to make better choices.
  5. Deciding things without thought to our needs and wants.
  6. Neglecting your values. 
  7. Making decisions that are not right today, but we think they will be in the long run.
  8. Saying things to please others, or avoid saying something that will hurt.
  9. Forgetting how to say “no.” We think we need to be all things to all people.  Step back so that others can step forward.
  10. Procrastinating. Once you’ve made a decision, own it. Doing so is key to living with it.

@george_ii20

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