Common decision-making mistakes - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

How to overcome the 10 biggest mistakes in decision making

Common decision-making mistakes

  1. Making impromptu decisions. Take the time to think about the pros and cons of your decision and weigh out the consequences.
  2. Lacking peace.  Take deep breaths in a quiet environment to evaluate the facts before you decide.
  3. Wallowing in the chaos of everyday life, or listening to too many other people. 
  4. Not considering priorities. Make a list of your important priorities. It will help you to make better choices.
  5. Deciding things without thought to our needs and wants.
  6. Neglecting your values. 
  7. Making decisions that are not right today, but we think they will be in the long run.
  8. Saying things to please others, or avoid saying something that will hurt.
  9. Forgetting how to say “no.” We think we need to be all things to all people.  Step back so that others can step forward.
  10. Procrastinating. Once you’ve made a decision, own it. Doing so is key to living with it.

395 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to overcome the 10 biggest mistakes in decision making

How to overcome the 10 biggest mistakes in decision making

https://www.reliableplant.com/Read/10910/how-to-overcome-10-biggest-mistakes-in-decision-making

reliableplant.com

1

Key Idea

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Making mistakes
Making mistakes

We're often presented with challenges that we've not encountered before that may leave us feeling fearful of making mistakes. But no one can reduce mistakes to zero.

Don’t be ashamed of your fear

Don't be ashamed or afraid of your fear of making mistakes, and don't think that being fearful is evidence that you're an indecisive leader. If you are prevention-focused, channel it to be bold and visionary.

The traditional image of a leader is one who is intelligent, brave, and unafraid. Your concern about making mistakes is there to remind you that you're in a challenging situation. Being cautious has value.

Emotional agility skills

Fear of mistakes can prevent people from taking action. Overcome this paralysis with emotional agility skills:

  • State your fears out loud. It will help diffuse them.
  • Accept reality. List every truth you need to accept. "I understand that people will not always behave in ideal ways."
  • Act on your values. Identify your five most important values related to decision-making in a crisis, then ask yourself how each of those is relevant to the critical choices you face.

4 more ideas

Starting with you

Focus on you first as the foundation. Your beliefs, attitude, and energy will determine your success. Spend time building up your confidence. 

  • Jot down your compet...
Thinking like a historian

Your resume is a marketing document, not an autobiography that details every past role and responsibility. Your objective it trying to prompt a purchase decision, which is to invite you in for an interview.

Delve into job boards and companies' careers pages. Pull a few postings, and find what theme or criteria keep coming up. For instance, if you continually find that they need someone who can solve complex problems and navigate ambiguity, and you can do that, then put it in your resume.

Looking at the big picture

Remember all of the skills you bring to the table. If you're applying for a project management role, consider highlighting the complementary skills you bring to the table. However, it should be a value add, not a random sidebar of your career.

Showing how your specific background allows you to bring a new perspective to your work will help you to stand out above other candidates.

4 more ideas

Default options

Deciding is too much effort so we’re likely to just stick with the default or safer option if it’s already been chosen for us. 

When we get offered too many choices, the same...

Best decision making happens in the morning

This is when serotonin is at it’s natural high, which helps to calm our brain. Thus, we feel less risk averse and so we can face risks and make harder choices.

The part our bodies play in decision-making

If we’re feeling hunger, thirst or sexual desire, that can actually spill over into the decision areas of our brains, making us feel more desire for big rewards when we make choices. 

This can lead us to make higher-risk choices and to want for more.

one more idea