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What is Media Manipulation?--A Definition and Explanation

Roots Of Media Manipulation

Media manipulation exploits the difference between perception and reality using the still remaining trust for truthful content it once had. But the current fast and hyper-competitive nature of the media business driven by clicks and often guided by untrained bloggers or malicious sources contributes to the spread of misinformation even among the mainstream media.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

What is Media Manipulation?--A Definition and Explanation

What is Media Manipulation?--A Definition and Explanation

https://www.forbes.com/sites/ryanholiday/2012/07/16/what-is-media-manipulation-a-definition-and-explanation/

forbes.com

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Key Ideas

"Getting it right is expensive, getting it first is cheap."

 - Michael Arrington, founder of TechCrunch, on news.

"Getting it right is expensive, getting it first is cheap."

 - Michael Arrington, founder of TechCrunch, on news.

Media Manipulation

It’s when media uses its reach and persuasion power to make people do or think things they otherwise would not. This often comes in the form of exaggeration, distortion, fabrication and simplification.

Roots Of Media Manipulation

Media manipulation exploits the difference between perception and reality using the still remaining trust for truthful content it once had. But the current fast and hyper-competitive nature of the media business driven by clicks and often guided by untrained bloggers or malicious sources contributes to the spread of misinformation even among the mainstream media.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Manipulation by passive and covert aggression
Manipulation by passive and covert aggression
  • Passive-aggression is an indirect way to go on the offensive. An example is when someone tries to "get you back" by resisting cooperation and giving you the "...
What a covert aggressive looks like
  • They pretend to be innocent, ignorant, or confused when they did something awful. This tactic is to make you question your judgment.
  • They don't give a straight answer to a straight question, but evade the question or change the subject when cornered.
  • They lie by omission or distortion by deliberately being vague.
  • They may either respond with charm and flattery, of will suddenly be angry.
  • They'll play the victim and make themselves out to be the one in distress.
  • They rationalize by giving a plausible excuse for engaging in inappropriate behavior, or they will downplay their behavior.
  • Covert aggressives don't feel bad, but they know you do. They will send you on a guilt trip so you will lighten your accusations.
How to deal with a covert-aggressive person
  • Let go of the pretense that if you play nice, they will play nice.
  • Know your vulnerabilities and focus on the one thing that really needs to change: yourself. You can only control what you do.
  • Set some boundaries for yourself. Be prepared for the consequences and set a support system.
  • Memorize the list of tactics used by an aggressive person. Then it is easier to recognize the attack.
  • If you're willing to accept an excuse, know that they will fling excuses at you until one stick.
  • Stay calm and polite, and avoid sarcasm, hostility, or threats.
  • Without being rude, be specific about what you expect or want from the other person. Aggressives will only participate if they can get something out of it. If they have to lose, they'll make sure you go down too. Ensure you propose win-win solutions
Confront Bullies, Safely
Confront Bullies, Safely

Manipulators become bullies when they intimidate or harms others, and pick on people they perceive as weaker. But standing up to bullies often cause them to retreat. 

When conf...

Set Consequences

When a psychological manipulator insists on violating your boundaries, and won’t take “no” for an answer, deploy consequence.

Effectively articulated, consequence gives pause to the manipulative individual, and compels her or him to shift from violation to respect.

Know How To Say “No”

Diplomatically but firmly. A well articulated “no” allows you to stand your ground while maintaining a workable relationship. 

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“Manipulation is an emotionally unhealthy psychological strategy used by people who are incapable of asking for what they want and need in a direct way. People who are trying to manipulate other...

Manipulation Techniques
  • The ‘foot-in-the-door’ technique consists of making a small and reasonable request, which then leads into a larger request. The initial appeal we supposed to make you feel more comfortable and invested in cooperating.
  • The ‘door-in-the-face’ technique consists of making a big request, having it rejected, then making a smaller one. Following the larger request, the smaller appeal seems reasonable comparatively.
The illusory truth effect
The illusory truth effect

It's our tendency to believe false information to be correct after repeated exposure to it.

The illusory truth effect is the reason why advertising and propaganda works.

Why repetition reinforces a belief

The typical explanation is that our brains take shortcuts to save energy:

  • Statements presented in as easy-to-read color are judged as more likely to be true.
  • Aphorisms that rhyme (like “what sobriety conceals, alcohol reveals") seem more accurate than non-rhyming versions.

    Carl Sagan
    Carl Sagan

    “One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we’ve been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It’s simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. ”

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    Money doesn't always motivate
    Money doesn't always motivate

    We may think of money as a great motivator, but it is a very poor one.

    Money is a good motivator only for boring jobs. For creativity or problem-solving activities, money r...

    Feeling the importance of our actions

    If we really want to be motivated, having a goal is not enough. We need to feel something. When we feel that what we do has meaning, we will feel motivated.

    Workers who fail to live up to their potential have lost sight of the importance and meaningfulness of their own jobs. If you could remind employees of the importance of their jobs, they might become highly motivated and productive.

    Giving mundane jobs meaning

    We can find meaning when we tell ourselves stories. Reflecting on ourselves and how we see ourselves creates an almost instant change in behavior. Self-awareness involves comparing the self to the ideas of what we should or could be.

    When people are told that their actions are being filmed, they consistently change their behavior. They work harder and are more consistent in their actions and values.

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    Anti-Social Social Media

    Studies show that the younger demographic wants restricted, private, secure and exclusive networks which cannot be thronged by unwanted people, like their parents.
    These exclusive online social ...

    Private Messaging Campfire

    Private messaging services like Facebook Messenger and Whatsapp are where private interactions happen and people are comfortable sharing details in private group messaging.
    There are new applications like Tex-Rex, The Infatuation, or Community which are helping brands penetrate this private space.

    Micro-Communities Campfire

    Micro-communities are platforms where people gather around shared interests, beliefs or passions. Some examples are Facebook Pages and Groups, Instagram Stories, Slack and Youtube.

    Brands can tap into this by partnering with influencers who have the kind of demographic they are targeting.

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    Storytelling is...
    Storytelling is...
    ...the process of using fact and narrative to communicate something to your audience. Some stories are factual, and some are embellished or improvised in order to better explain the core message.
    Why we tell stories
    • Stories solidify abstract concepts and simplify complex messages;
    • Stories bring people together: stories connect us through the way we feel and respond to them;
    • Stories inspire and motivate, by tapping into people’s emotions and baring both the good and bad.
    Good stories are …
    • Entertaining. Good stories keep the reader engaged and interested in what’s coming next.
    • Educational. Good stories spark curiosity and add to the reader’s knowledge bank.
    • Universal. Good stories are relatable to all readers and tap into emotions and experiences that most people undergo.
    • Organized. Good stories follow a succinct organization that helps convey the core message and helps readers absorb it.
    • Memorable. Whether through inspiration, scandal, or humor, good stories stick in the reader’s mind.

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    Lessons from Social Media
    • At the beginning of the decade, we idealistically thought to connect the world would bring people together and help them become more tolerant of their differences. Sadly, the rise of intoleran...
    The best time in world history

    It is the best time in world history to be alive. We are safer, healthier, less violent, more tolerant, more educated, and more literate than ever. We have more economic freedom, more knowledge, more entertainment, and more connectivity.

    But, the overwhelming amount of information and opportunity makes it more difficult to find meaning and purpose. We should learn how to deal with the effects of new technologies and be aware of its limitations.

    Corporate overlords

    Amazon's logistical efficiency, Apple's global supply chain and other tech companies like Samsung, Facebook, and Google are corporations that are holding the world together more than any international governmental organization.

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    Writing is intimidating. There’s this expectation of artful precision, mercurial grammatical rules, and the weird angst that comes with writing for other people. You start with a tidy nu...
    Writing is Deliberate
    Choosing the words to describe your work means you’re doing it on purpose. 

    You’re going on the record as someone who thinks about why they do what they do, and understands how each decision affects the results. And developing this knack for critical thinking will also make you better at what you do.

    Read widely, with maximum curiosity

    The clearest thinkers tend to be those that draw from multiple disciplines.

    Develop the habit of reading and eliminate/reduce the things that might stop you from doing that (e.g. mindl...

    Put reality first and theory last

    Confusing models with reality is a cardinal sin of clear thinking. 

    If you believe too strongly in your models of the world, you can start to ignore evidence that your model is wrong.

    Campbell’s law

    The basic idea is that when you reward people for a particular measure — clicks, dollars, likes, etc. — people will find a way to “game” the system.

    For example: If journalism is fueled by clicks, journalists are going to write sensationalist clickbait.

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