The Benefits Of Intermittent Reinforcement - Deepstash

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The Power of Incentives: Inside the Hidden Forces That Shape Behavior

The Benefits Of Intermittent Reinforcement

  • Rewarding the behavior immediately may take time away from the behavior’s continuation.
  • It’s cheaper not to reward every instance of a desired behavior.
  • By making the rewards unpredictable, you trigger excitement and thus get an increase in response without increasing the amount of reinforcement.
  • Since the person is already adapted to not always being rewarded, they take longer to stopping the behavior when reinforcement is removed.

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The first views on motivation
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