Glossing over mundane work - Deepstash

Glossing over mundane work

Presenting themselves differently depending on who they’re talking to (outsiders or insiders) can mean that anyone who is not a true insider at the company ends up with a partial or biased view of the work. 

The full nature of the work is often glossed over, and that’s a problem for those considering taking one of these jobs.

When they only hear about the gloss, prospective employees end up with false expectations that tend to fuel the cycle of disappointment.

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MORE IDEAS FROM The 'glossy' dream jobs that become nightmares

  • Provide realistic job previews: An honest balance of the glamorous and less glamorous aspects of the job.
  • Consider alternative ways of assembling tasks so that the less pleasant tasks are spread across employees and jobs.
  • Be open to employee efforts to craft and tweak their jobs and create new opportunities within their organizations.
  • Exercise caution when listing “passion” as a job requirement (unless there's clarity about assessing it).

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Any job (especially an entry-level position) has elements of drudgery.

This gap between expectations and the day-to-day reality of jobs is a phenomenon labelled as “glossy work” in a recently published study.

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  • Glossy work dissonance can spur attempts to change the actual job, frustration and a quick exit from the position.
  • Glossy work also creates a dilemma about how to present the work and themselves to the world.

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Performing many mundane tasks remains a reality in all jobs despite the promise that AI will eliminate more and more rote chores.

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RELATED IDEA

Romanticising your dream job

Landing your dream job can come with downsides, especially if your passions involve jobs with routine day-to-day tasks that you are less passionate about.

For example, you may expect to create fascinating algorithms in artificial intelligence jobs that will solve big problems but end up doing routine data collection and cleaning tasks.

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Experience prior to an entry-level position

A recent analysis of close to 4 million jobs posted on LinkedIn since late 2017 showed that 35% of postings for “entry-level” positions asked for years of prior relevant work experience.

That requirement was even more common in certain industries. More than 60% of listings for entry-level software and IT Services jobs, for instance, required three or more years of experience. In short, it seems entry-level jobs aren’t for people just entering the workforce at all. 

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Waning interest

There’s a very clear and current phenomenon of people experiencing a waning interest in their work.

Particularly at the beginning of the pandemic, people started spending a lot more time at home and that gave them a lot more downtime. When you’re in the office and it’s hectic, you don’t have as much space and time to think. Being at home made people start to question: how can I live a life or have a career that’s in line with what I’m actually interested in?

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