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This 3-Minute Exercise Will Change the Way You Solve Problems

https://forge.medium.com/learn-structured-thinking-in-3-minutes-550a2dc2123c

forge.medium.com

This 3-Minute Exercise Will Change the Way You Solve Problems
The skill can help you become an innovative problem-solver and a pro at answering tough questions.

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Structured thinking

Structured thinking

With structured thinking, you methodically break down problems and solve them bit by bit.

It's your ability to use logic, practice deduction, and build a big answer by asking many small questions.

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Improve your structured thinking

The best way to improve your structured thinking is to ask yourself questions where you can't find the answers online (like, for example, how many customers visit your favorite restaurant every year?)

First, you start with what you know, then further break the problem down.

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Structured thinking is innovative

Structure may seem like it is stifling creativity, but it is not. Creativity thrives on rules. Within the boundaries, your thoughts can think freely.

When you know how to think, not just what to think, you can become an innovative problem solver, which can benefit you throughout your life.

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When we are curious, we view tough situations more creatively. Studies have found that curiosity is associated with less defensive reactions to stress and less aggressive reactions to provocation.

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Curiosity encourages members of a group to put themselves in one another’s shoes and take an interest in one another’s ideas rather than focus only on their own perspective.

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Albert Einstein
“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first fifty-five minute..."

Albert Einstein

The frames we use to see the world

The frames we create for what we experience both inform and limit the way we think.  And most of the time we are not aware of the frames we are using.

Being able to question and shift your frame of reference is an important key to enhancing your imagination because it reveals completely different insights.

Reframing problems

It takes effort, attention, and practice to see the world around you in a brand-new light.

You can practice reframing by physically or mentally changing your point of view, by seeing the world from others’ perspectives, and by asking questions that begin with “why.”