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The Art of Creating a Community

https://guykawasaki.com/the_art_of_crea/

guykawasaki.com

The Art of Creating a Community
I admit it: I'm a user-group junkie. I got my first taste of user groups when I worked for Apple-speaking at their meetings was one of my great pleasures. Their members were unpaid, raging, inexorable thunderlizard evangelists for Macintosh and Apple II.

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How To Create A Good Community

How To Create A Good Community
  1. Create something worth building a community around. A good enough product may even form its own community independently.
  2. Identify the groups of people forming around your products and recruit them to build a community.
  3. Assign someone the task of building a community
  4. Make sure your product is somewhat customizable, extensible, and malleable. 
  5. Create an open system by giving the community a documentation and tools to tweak your product.
  6. Welcome criticism
  7. Foster the exchange of ideas and opinions. Providing forums for customers and company employees to interact yields valuable insight.
  8. Publicize the existence of the community. It should be an integral part of your sales and marketing efforts.

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The Why of Life

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Leaders gain followers due to trust. If customers (or end-users), and employees understand your core beliefs and drive, you start to gain their trust. 

This happens when you demonstrate and communicate that you share the same values and convictions.

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Corporate Speak

Corporate Speak

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Group Development Theory

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Forming

This stage of teamwork is all about first meetings and first impressions.

What everyone needs most is a clear understanding of their part in the journey and a setup for building emotional connections. Setting goals together puts their skills and interests into the open.

Storming

Most teams go through the storming stage in some form or another because discord is inevitable. The key value to emphasize in the team is positive intent. 

A little conflict is needed to bring upfront weak spots in projects and to bring new valid arguments to the table. But constant storming leads to the destruction of productivity, projects, and ultimately, the team itself.