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The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking

https://fs.blog/2013/07/five-elements-of-effective-thinking/

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The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking
Do you want to come up with more imaginative ideas? Do you stumble with complicated problems? Do you want to find new ways to confront challenges? Of course, you do. So do I. But when is the last time you thought about how you think? Do you have a process for making decisions?

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Charlie Munger
It is remarkable how much long-term advantage people like us have gotten by trying to be consistently not stupid, instead of trying to be very intelligent.”

Charlie Munger

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5 elements of effective thinking

  1. Understand deeply: Be brutally honest about what you know and don’t know. Then see what’s missing, identify the gaps, and fill them in.
  2. Make mistakes: Mistakes are great teachers; they highlight unforeseen opportunities and holes in your understanding.
  3. Raise questions: Constantly create questions to clarify and extend your understanding.
  4. Follow the flow of ideas: Look back to see where ideas came from and then look ahead to discover where those ideas may lead.
  5. Change: You can always improve, grow, and extract more out of your education, yourself, and the way you live your life.

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First-principles thinking

Breaking down complicated problems into basic elements and then reassemble them from the ground up.

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A first principle

...is a foundational proposition or assumption that stands alone. We cannot deduce first principles from any other proposition or assumption.

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Cutting through the dogma

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Default options

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The part our bodies play in decision-making

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