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How to Get Over Productivity Guilt

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-get-over-productivity-guilt-1831146802

lifehacker.com

How to Get Over Productivity Guilt
As a Lifehacker reader, you probably spend some portion of your life actively trying to live better. That can look like a lot of things, but it usually includes trying to be as productive as possible. Constantly pushing yourself to be productive, however, can get pretty stressful.

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Productivity guilt

It’s the constant nagging feeling that you should be doing more. And if you’re not doing everything, then you’re a lazy slacker who will never reach your goals. -- Scott H. Young

That’s simply not true. Even small efforts have a cumulative effect.

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Be Imperfect

Be Imperfect

No one is perfect—not even the people you admire most. The reality is we can’t realistically implement every life hack out there. 

Do not worry if something falls by the wayside. Pick it up again if you think it worked. Doing it a little is better than not doing it.

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The Flaw Of Perfection

If you were to do everything you’re advised to do to have a perfect, productive life, you’d basically have no time to just be alive, no matter how efficiently executed. 

Separate the nice-to-have from the essential. Most advice is nice-to-have—it helps, but only a little. If you can focus on the essential things that matter for your few goals, then you can stop feeling guilty about everything else.

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Start Where You’re At

The question is never, “What should I do, ideally, to solve this problem?” Instead it’s always, How could I do things a little differently than last time for a little better results?

The only thing you need to do is take one step: that’s productive enough. 

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Multitasking

Those that do multitask the most are the worst at it.

Productivity is defined as, “having the power to produce.” By that definition, multitasking is the opposite of productivity becau...

Not Getting Enough Rest

  • When we get tired, we make mistakes, which means more time and money must be put into correcting those mistakes. 
  • When we get tired, it takes us longer to do things, costing more time and money to do something that could get done in less time if we were fully awake. 

Doing Everything Yourself

Either one of two problems: you don’t like delegating tasks, or you’re having trouble prioritizing which tasks deserve your time. 

Figure out which tasks deserve your time the most (or those tasks that you do best), and outsource something that’s of low priority. 

one more idea

What Deep Work Is

A process of performing “professional activities…in a state of distraction-free concentration that pushes your cognitive capabilities to their limit. These efforts create new value, improve ...

Shallow work

The non-cognitively demanding, logistical-style tasks, often performed while distracted, tend not to create much new value in the world and are easy to replicate.

Recognizing our limited willpower

...is the first element of deep work.

That means you won’t have the mental discipline to stay concentrated on a single task unless you prepare your mind and environment to it.

Switching between tasks

Most of us spend our days jumping between tasks and tools.

In fact, most people average only 3 minutes on any given task before switching to something else (and only 2 minutes on a di...

Task switching and focus

Taking on additional tasks simultaneously can destroy up to 80% of your productive time:

  • Focusing on one task at a time = 100% of your productive time available.
  • Juggling two tasks at a time = 40% of your productive time for each and 20% lost to context switching.
  • Juggling three tasks at a time = 20% of your productive time for each and 40% lost to context switching.

A schedule for sustained attention

It includes:
  • Large chunks of focused “flow” time for more demanding projects.
  • “Themed” days to reduce the need to recalibrate between different tasks.
  • Advanced planning so you can prioritize meaningful work.
  • Realistic time set aside for admin, communication, and meetings.
  • Clear expectations for your teammates so they know when not to interrupt you.