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The Past Isn't Objective: Your "Story" Is Your Responsibility

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/quantum-leaps/202006/the-past-isnt-objective-your-story-is-your-responsibility

psychologytoday.com

The Past Isn't Objective: Your "Story" Is Your Responsibility
Our "story" is constantly changing in light of new experiences and insights. We reinterpret our past based on where we are in the present.

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The Past Is Flexible

The Past Is Flexible

The past, and our understanding of it, is a reflection of our current state of mind.

The past, which is assumed to be static, is in fact constantly changing. Historical facts are looked at with new data, new experiences, and according to what new shape the collective human memory takes.

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The Stories We Tell About Our Lives

Our story, which we are narrating to others, is constantly changing with our new experiences and insights, as our lives go by.

These stories become our identity and certain core memories, or life events of immense sorrow or happiness, stick with us forever.

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Mental Strength For Revisiting The Past

One can change the story of one’s past including what it meant. New lessons can be learned by revisiting the past in an objective manner, without guilt, remorse or any grudge.

Becoming emotionally and mentally tough makes us face our past with courage, and helps us change the meaning of our often traumatic past.

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Telling our origin story

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Leadership origin stories

Research found four dominant themes of origin stories among leaders: being, engaging, performing, and accepting.

These themes act as lenses, contributing to how leaders see themselves.

The "being" leadership story

Leaders who use this lens always thought of themselves as leaders. They admit to having a natural call to leadership that started in childhood.

In current leadership, people who use this lens often note personal qualities such as confidence, optimism, and natural leadership styles.

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The perception of time

Although some physicists would argue against the existence of time, we all do have a perception of time that reflects the reality of our lives on Earth.

False pasts

Most of us forget more than we remember. We change memories to make sense of what has happened in our lives. When we then recall a memory, we reconstruct the events in our minds and even shape them to fit in with any new information.

Understand the future

Many of us think of our past as a kind of a video library where we can look at records of our lives. If memories were fixed like videotapes, you would find it difficult to imagine a new situation.

It is our past memories that help us imagine a future, and to preview future events. This skill of using the past to predict the future helps us try out different hypothetical scenarios before we commit.

John Green, Looking for Alaska

“Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia.”

John Green, Looking for Alaska

We use our memories to imagine the future

We predict what the future will look like by using our memories. This is how actions we do repeatedly become routine. For example, you have an ideas of what your day will look like at work tomorrow based on what your day was like today, and all the other days you’ve spent working.

But memory also helps people predict what it will be like to do things they haven’t done before.

Past and future for amnesia patients

An evidence that memory and imagining the future might go hand in hand comes from research related to amnesia patients. Studies show that when they lose their pasts, it seems they lose their futures as well.

Functional MRI scans made possible for researchers to discover that many of the same brain structures are involved in both remembering and forecasting.